Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Should I go for it????

Collapse

X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Should I go for it????

    for the last few years I've (like lots of you on here) been making my own jams, chutneys, jellies, marmalades and the like. We give them away to family and friends and make up hampers for folks at christmasstime.

    now i dont want to appear big headed, but people repeatedly tell me they are fabby and say i should sell them.

    so far i have resisted - not sure why, but i think cos i see it as something i enjoy doing and think that maybe it wont be so much fun if i turn it into a 'business'.

    this year looks like a really lean one for us and i'm thinking of ways to make some cash. clearly selling them would give us a few quid here and there.......b-u-t......

    so what advice do my always honest grape friends have? should i or shouldn't i?

    and if i did, how on earth would i go about it?
    how would i know what to charge?
    where would i get my jars from (presumably recycled ones wouldnt do?)
    and how do i go about getting a table at a farmers market? if indeed that is the way to get 'known'?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Scottishnewbie View Post
    how on earth would i go about it?
    Funny that, I've been thinking the same thing, and did a bit of research last week. Have a read of this: http://www.wychavon.gov.uk/cms/pdf/w...farm-shops.pdf

    and this: Registration of food business - Great Yarmouth Borough Council

    Info from Food Standards Agency here

    Originally posted by Scottishnewbie View Post
    where would i get my jars from (presumably recycled ones wouldnt do?)
    You must use new ones. Look on eBay for smaller quantities, or look in the preserve forum for the recommended supplier: I think it was something like Colorlites (who sell on eBay)

    Have a look here for info about not poisoning your customers

    Originally posted by Scottishnewbie View Post
    and how do i go about getting a table at a farmers market? if indeed that is the way to get 'known'?
    That's a great way to start, also take some jars to local shops on a "sale or return" basis if you like

    You can google your local farmer's markets, this is mine
    Last edited by Two_Sheds; 24-01-2011, 07:22 AM.
    All gardeners know better than other gardeners." -- Chinese Proverb.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Scottishnewbie View Post
      how would i know what to charge?
      You have to charge what people will pay - that will depend on your target market. Round here, they wouldn't pay more than 39p for a pot of jam, but if you are selling in a Waitrose area, you can charge quite a bit more.

      It's really important not to underprice your product - you'll run yourself ragged and not make any money. My friend makes those huge cupcakes but is too cheap. She is now baking every day and making only pennies from it.

      and here's a success story to spur you on: Teenager’s homemade jam to earn him pots of money - Times Online
      Last edited by Two_Sheds; 24-01-2011, 07:24 AM.
      All gardeners know better than other gardeners." -- Chinese Proverb.

      Comment


      • #4
        for charging, why not go around farm shops/delis in your area and see how much they charge. You'd need to sell something special though as lots of people are running small home businesses.

        There should be free business link (small business) advice from your local council or ask in the job centre (even if you're not claiming, they should have some advice to help you out!)

        Good luck!

        Comment


        • #5
          Have a look at the forums on Martin Lewis, particularly the up your income section here Up Your Income - MoneySavingExpert.com Forums there might be a few ideas if you have a mooch around

          Comment


          • #6
            Been contemplating this myself - I bought 56 jars and lids from ebay for 29.99 last year but didn't find the time to make the quantities. I have told myself this year will be the year though!

            I did speak to the lady who runs our farmers market, and she said I'd have to get my premises inspected by the local council, and asked if I'd get public liability insurance (I'm not sure if all farmers markets ask for this).

            I did knock up a spreadsheet to try and work out costs and profit last year (I've uploaded it to my webspace: http://www.realmensow.co.uk/spreadsheet/costs.xls). It's very rough and ready, but found that it helped me work out how much money I'd make / need.

            I used free fruit, as I had loads of it from friends trees and my own plants, so that helped make a bit more.

            Good luck whatever you decided, please let us know how you go!
            Real Men Sow - a cheery allotment blog.

            Comment


            • #7
              As far as should you go for it, it depends on if you're happy to turn a hobby into a job. In other words, presumably you enjoy making these things but at the moment you do it because you want to. If it was a business then you'd have to do it and sometimes that can sap the enjoyment. You also need to work out exactly what it would cost you (and if you're thinking of making it a business you may need to factor in future costs like employing somebody else part time depending on your ambitions) and working that up to how much you would need to charge to cover those costs. Often in mounts up more than you'd think. Work out your target market and visit similar markets etc. Are they already saturated in your area? Are there any farm shops who would be interested etc and how much do similar suppliers charge in comparison with what you'd need to charge. If you can get the balance right and you're sure you want to go for it then don't delay but make sure you've thought it out properly in the first place.

              Some of us live in the past, always talking about back then. Some of us live in the future, always planning what we are going to do. And, then there are those, who neither look behind or ahead, but just enjoy the moment of right now.

              Which one are you and is it how you want to be?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Alison View Post
                you ...need to charge to cover those costs. Often in mounts up more than you'd think.
                Factor in ingredients cost, materials eg jars, pans, printer ink for labels, gas/elec, petrol to deliver the jams, man hours worked ...

                I get asked to make clothes for people, until I tell them the cost of fabric + the hours it takes me to make it up (even on minimum wage it would be 3 times the price of Primark etc)

                Don't let that put you off, lots of business don't start to show a profit in the first year or so
                Last edited by Two_Sheds; 25-01-2011, 08:35 AM.
                All gardeners know better than other gardeners." -- Chinese Proverb.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think, too home grown produce is just so much tastier. So in turn, your preserves are that much nicer. I tasted mine vs hartleys (who I normally enjoy) jam yesterday... and i thought that even unbiased mine is just that much tastier. Shop bought ones seem to be SO sweet too, too sweet now, after tasting my own... extending the life maybe? *shrug*. What else do they stick in it too though? Colouring, etc..

                  Fruit + Sugar (+setting agent) is good enough for me

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Anyway - back to your business, I'd say go for it. I've ran two businesses in my time, and will hopefully be running another one shortly.

                    I don't like working for other people. I decided to work where I am now, as I thought I could provide a positive impact to people directly (or indirectly).

                    Being your own boss, despite the stress in the early years (a good accountant helps) is amazing. My wife has recently setup work, but had to postpone it due to being 'up le duff' (oops) - you can't do that in a normal day job that easily.

                    I'd work out your living costs / factor in your/partners current wages etc. See what you can / can't afford to do.

                    Business Link were really helpful when I set my first one up (which rapidly grew and became one of the largest companies in its sector) so I'd recommend them all the time to anyone now. There's also bags of business related forums.

                    One trick I learnt from my first business venture was to know when enough was enough, and when you were flogging a dead horse (i.e. our bubble burst). Of course, running your own business can bring other joys bar the money too.

                    Oh yes, don't forget if you're working from home you can claim some % of your utility bill usage back (heating, gas, electricity, etc) which I believe, is tax free (don't quote me on that though..)

                    Would post more, but boss has just cracked the whip. (grr, see what I mean!)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Two_Sheds View Post
                      Funny that, I've been thinking the same thing, and did a bit of research last week. Have a read of this: http://www.wychavon.gov.uk/cms/pdf/wdc-env-farm-shops.pdf
                      My God what a load of utterly un-necessary regulations - APPALLING!

                      Things like


                      The following items of produce may be sold by number instead of weight:

                      And these may be sold by the bunch:
                      How big is a bunch btw?

                      And back on topic


                      Jam/Honey
                      If you produce your own honey or make your own jam it may only be sold in specified
                      quantities:
                      57g, 113g, 227g, 340g, 454g, 690g or multiples of 454g.
                      (These are the metric equivalents of 2oz, 4oz, 8oz, 12oz and 1lb and equate
                      to standard jam jar sizes.)
                      Why?
                      To see a world in a grain of sand
                      And a heaven in a wild flower

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        folks, i really appreciate all these amazingly helpful comments so thank you very much.

                        i think i am going to go for it and have decided my business name "Laura's Larder"- thoughts?

                        Also, i think i want to run some cookery classes. i pride myself on being able to cook a tasty meal very frugally. i know lots of folks cant cook and spend a fortune on pre prepared meals, so I'm thinking that a 'come along and cook your own dinner' with locally sourced (ie ME) fresh ingedients might be interesting to people.....

                        i just need to find somewhere that will lend/hire me their cooking facilities on a fairly regular basis..........????

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Scottishnewbie View Post
                          have decided my business name "Laura's Larder"- thoughts?
                          Run any name through google: Caterers in Colne - Lauras Larder - ThomsonLocal.com

                          http://www.independent.co.uk/life-st...am-452817.html
                          Last edited by Two_Sheds; 25-01-2011, 08:14 PM.
                          All gardeners know better than other gardeners." -- Chinese Proverb.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Scottishnewbie View Post
                            ... i think i want to run some cookery classes. i pride myself on being able to cook a tasty meal very frugally. i know lots of folks cant cook and spend a fortune on pre prepared meals, so I'm thinking that a 'come along and cook your own dinner' with locally sourced (ie ME) fresh ingedients might be interesting to people.....

                            i just need to find somewhere that will lend/hire me their cooking facilities on a fairly regular basis..........????
                            Now have you got a nearby school that may have these?

                            I wonder if adult education would be interested in backing a course like this? When I asked my local head of adult ed. if there would be a need for a tutor for literacy, she told me I would need a qualification but this was not a hard thing to get and they would help me.

                            Another thought though - is there a community based organisation that may have kitchen facilities that you could use for a course? Some of our children's centres have these - not sure what you have near you.
                            Whooops - now what are the dogs getting up to?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Good Luck in your venture, I wish you every success
                              Granny on the Game

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Recent Blog Posts

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X