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  • Thanks burnie and B Porcupine. Burnie, you posted a photo of a red rose last July, is that your Munstead Wood?

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    • Originally posted by Babru View Post
      Thanks burnie and B Porcupine. Burnie, you posted a photo of a red rose last July, is that your Munstead Wood?
      Yes it is, once fully open the weight does pull them over a bit as you can see.
      If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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      • I have a very old rose, at least over 50yrs old. I believe it is a Floribunda. It has a mix of 5 and 7 leaves on it's stems, which I believe is normal for older style roses. It is need of pruning now the flowers are finished and so I get a second flush but I'd like to know how hard I can prune it at this time of year. Ideally I'd like to cut it right down to maybe a couple of feet to try and get more new shoots and reinvigorate this grand old lady.

        Any help appreciated.
        Always aim for the best result possible not the best possible result

        Forever indebted to Potstubsdustbins

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        • This may be of help, I have to admit I'm a rather poor pruner of Roses, never really learnt the dark art.
          https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=176
          If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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          • Oh..... whoops. I am really brutal with my roses, whenever they are in the way / getting too big, or I just know I have time to prune them, and it's always been in autumn for me. That that said, I think the oldest roses in my garden are around 20 years so maybe they can take way more of a beating

            Thanks for the article Burnie - looks like I also don't have the dark art (actually, I'm the definite haphazard end of the scale )
            Shortie

            "There are only two lasting bequests we can hope to give our children; one of these is roots, the other wings" - Hodding Carter

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            • Thanks for the link Burnie, very useful, just not sure I am brave enough to cut this old lady down to the ground.

              Shortie - That's kind of the way I do things too, but this rose is so old and was planted by the previous owners Grandparents I believe and some of the family still live locally, I'd be the worst woman in the world if I caused it's demise!
              Last edited by peanut; 26-06-2020, 08:10 PM.
              Always aim for the best result possible not the best possible result

              Forever indebted to Potstubsdustbins

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              • The sun went in and it's starting to rain, but this shines like a beacon
                Click image for larger version

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                If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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                • This video is excellent it taught me how to cut back the rose,gave me confidence before I tackled the Rose at my mums house that’s trained against the front of the house,I need to prune it again,it’s reaching the soffit & it went through a gap by the guttering last time. You can be quite brutal with them,this video helps you tackle it in stages it’s really helpful
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNiOW1kBNGo

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                  • Peanut, prune your rose bush to an outward facing bud.
                    Take out the weak branches or those that are crossing each other.
                    Prune it lightly in the autumn and prune it again in early spring.
                    If you get a very harsh winter you dont want to loose all your new growth.
                    So, when you're sure the bush has made it through winter you can then prune it a bit harder.
                    Hope this helps.


                    And when your back stops aching,
                    And your hands begin to harden.
                    You will find yourself a partner,
                    In the glory of the garden.

                    Rudyard Kipling.sigpic

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                    • I have made a flower box to plant 3 roses into the dimensions are 4ft by 2ft by 20 inches deep I will also plant some petunias for ground cover in the box, but OH thinks that the box is a bit big, I can reduce the hight by 5 inches quite easily but I will not reduce the length or width of the box so what hight would you recommend filling the box is not a problem
                      it may be a struggle to reach the top, but once your over the hill your problems start.

                      Member of the Nutters Club but I think I am just there to make up the numbers

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                      • I've never been able to keep a rose happy in a pot for more than about three years, but they've gone on to do fine when I've planted them out. Likely because I haven't spent enough time looking after them, so serves me right.

                        I think the larger the better pot, and the David Austen site says "For best results, your pot should be at least 16” (40cm) deep and 16” (40cm) across. It is surprising how much difference a larger pot will make to the performance of your rose. As the growth of your rose is determined to a large extent by the size of the root, we always recommend as large a pot as possible. A larger pot will also retain moisture for longer, which is key to a healthy vigorous plant."

                        If you can make it 20 inches deep, so much the better.

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                        • Thanks Babru I have kept it at 20 inches deep, do you grow David Austen roses and if so are you pleased with them I tried growing D. A. roses a number of years ago but they didn't do very well I think it was too wet for them, so wonder if they are any better nowadays
                          it may be a struggle to reach the top, but once your over the hill your problems start.

                          Member of the Nutters Club but I think I am just there to make up the numbers

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                          • I have had various Austens over the years, some better than others. I'm in Edinburgh though, so drier but colder than you (I'm from Ayrshire originally so I know what you're talking about).

                            One that has always been great is Gertrude Jekyll, a good do-er, strong and tough, great perfume. Others I would recommend as disease free would be The Mayflower, Princess Anne. Queen of Sweden has less scent but is a strong grower. Others that have done well have been Gentle Hermione and Glamis Castle.

                            I don't like all Austens (I hate droopy flower heads eg Lady Emma Hamilton, had to go!), but the ones I've listed have done well for me.

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                            • Is it possible to take a cutting from a climbing rose? If so, how do I do it, and is this a suitable timer of year?
                              We’re moving house, and I’d like to take the rose in the back garden to our new place.

                              Thanks!
                              He-Pep!

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                              • Click image for larger version

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                                If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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