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Penellype's Allotment

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  • #31
    I'm not keen on sprouts, but I do grow a lot of broccoli/calabrese which take up large areas of my netted space at home and would be quite happy in the tunnel. I can also grow my kohlrabi, swedes and turnips there and I'm looking forward to trying cauliflowers and possibly Romanesco as well. I may also put leeks in the tunnel if there is room in case of leek moth.

    I would think the walk from the car to "my" plot is 10-20 yards, which isn't bad at all. If I struggle to carry the water carriers I can always put them in a wheelbarrow. Fine details will have to wait until I see the state of the entrance path that runs along the hedge line, but I'm pretty sure its grass.

    From the photos I took, if I zoom in I think the water butt near the shed has a connection hole - there seems to be water marks down it. I may well get another and link the 2 together. If the forecast snow arrives I could be spending the first few days on the plot making snowballs, which I could then put into water butts before they melt... but it has to snow enough first, and it may not.
    A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP. - Leonard Nimoy

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    • #32
      Does your allotment site have any access to shared equipment?
      Our place has a few bits of kit like strimmer, mower, fence post basher available for loan or hire at a very nominal fee. It is definitely worth asking;-)

      I made ‘semiraised’ beds in the first year ( basically dig over the beds, and pop the top spadeful of soil from the ‘paths’ onto the beds as well), as I also didn’t want to spend money on path edging at the same time as buying tools etc.
      It has worked well, and I plan to keep it that way as I like being able to hoe easily, which I think would be harder with wooden bed edges getting in the way!

      I have since discovered a local charity which sells reclaimed timber, which was helpful when I needed to replace some timber edging on a communal path which runs along the edge of my plot- and much cheaper than new timber from a diy store- have a look and see if there are any near to you?Find your nearest enterprise – Community Wood Recycling

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Chestnut View Post
        Does your allotment site have any access to shared equipment?
        Our place has a few bits of kit like strimmer, mower, fence post basher available for loan or hire at a very nominal fee. It is definitely worth asking;-)

        I made ‘semiraised’ beds in the first year ( basically dig over the beds, and pop the top spadeful of soil from the ‘paths’ onto the beds as well), as I also didn’t want to spend money on path edging at the same time as buying tools etc.
        It has worked well, and I plan to keep it that way as I like being able to hoe easily, which I think would be harder with wooden bed edges getting in the way!

        I have since discovered a local charity which sells reclaimed timber, which was helpful when I needed to replace some timber edging on a communal path which runs along the edge of my plot- and much cheaper than new timber from a diy store- have a look and see if there are any near to you?Find your nearest enterprise – Community Wood Recycling
        Thanks for these suggestions - I will certainly ask if there is any access to shared equipment when I talk to the man on Tuesday.

        I'm planning on doing what you did with the beds at least for the first year to see how I get on, partly because I haven't yet decided exactly how big I want them to be.

        I've checked the wood recycling site, but the nearest one to me is in Hull which is a long way to go. I may be able to get hold of some old pallets from the stables, which would be useful for things like compost bins, but constructing raised beds from them is probably beyond me. I will have to see how things go.
        A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP. - Leonard Nimoy

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Penellype View Post
          I thought I would start at the beginning, and hopefully catalogue the progress I make (assuming I have the time). I suspect some people were wondering how long it would take me to do this!

          In 2012 I decided to investigate the possibility of an allotment, as a lot of my garden was paved. I was told that there was a long waiting list, and I decided not to pursue the idea. Later that year the pergola that was above the existing patio became unsafe and I had it taken down. At the same time I had the patio taken up and converted into a vegetable garden, separated from the flower garden by trellis and an archway. No need for an allotment, I thought.

          By January 2014 I had somewhat expanded my vegetable growing, and went back to the allotment idea. This time I put my name down, but was told there was a long waiting list. A couple of months later my friend broke her leg badly and gave me her vegetable garden and greenhouse to look after and use. I thought of taking my name off the allotment list, especially as my friend had a 2nd accident in 2016 and was again unable to do much gardening for another year. She shows no sign of wanting her veg plot and greenhouse back.

          On Friday afternoon, taking me completely by surprise, there was a knock at the door and a man from the parish council offered me an allotment. At the time I was busy doing something and my first response was "I don't know". I really had absolutely no idea whether I wanted it or not, although I was certainly more interested when I realized which one it was - the one nearest to my house and with the big green mesh tunnel. The man only works on Mondays and Tuesdays, and he is not going to be in his office until 2nd January, so he said think about it over Christmas and let him know.

          This is absolutely typical of me. I rarely commit myself to anything immediately as I like to think about things rather than jump in on the spur of the moment. However once I have made a decision i like to get on with it.

          I walked down to the allotment (takes about 5 minutes) and had a look. The plot has clearly been looked after as most of it looks as though most of it has been dug within the last year or so. There are plenty of weeds but it isn't a thicket of brambles or wall to wall grass. The mesh tunnel is probably something like 6-8ft wide and maybe 15ft long although it is hard to tell from the road. There is a small shed, a water butt and 2 compost bins. The plot is surrounded on 3 sides by hedges - hawthorn (I think) on the roadside (north) and tall leylandii to the south and west. I'm pretty sure the council cut the roadside hedge as I've seen it being done, but by the look of the leylandii it could well be the plot holder's responsibility to cut it - I will need to ask. I know from previous enquiries that there is no electricity or running water.

          By the time I got back home I had decided that I really wanted it, and the more I thought about it the more certain I became. If I can't cope I can always give it up, but for 30 for a year (and the previous plot holder would like something for the mesh tunnel, which is fair enough) I think I would be mad not to take it.

          I went back down this afternoon and took some photos from the road:

          [ATTACH=CONFIG]77939[/ATTACH]

          The plot starts with the grass path beyond the wheelbarrow as there is a wire fence there:

          [ATTACH=CONFIG]77940[/ATTACH]

          The hedge side of the mesh tunnel is more neglected:

          [ATTACH=CONFIG]77941[/ATTACH]

          It is hard to see a lot of it as the roadside hedge is quite high, but you can get an idea from the photos. To me this looks an ideal area for things like compost bins, a pile of horse muck and maybe rhubarb and comfrey. I'll have to remember to leave access to the hedge for cutting.

          The tunnel itself is full of weeds. I assume the entrance is at the far end, but it is hard to see.
          Your excitement shines through Pen' so refreshing to hear your thoughts and plans with so much enthusiasm, what a lovely christmas present the allotment will make you.
          The very best of luck and success with your new venture.
          Gee
          Never Let the BAD be the Enemy of the GOOD

          Conservation and Preservation for the Future Generation

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          • #35
            Lady P,

            If your looking at creating raised beds, have a look at these


            Wooden Pallet Collars for Standard Pallets - Pallet Boxes from BiGDUG UK

            It's what I used when I set up mine, and by fastening 3 together make a nice 1m x 2m raised bed.

            Click image for larger version

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            With a bit of wood stain they are ideal, and don't think myself they are overly priced.

            I did however get mine free from a supplier I used to deliver to when I was a truck driver!
            "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit, wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad"

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            • #36
              Interesting idea Deano. At the moment I am collecting ideas, but I think I may play with the plot for a while before putting in any permanent beds. We'll see.

              At the moment the whole thing is unhelpfully covered with a layer of snow, which should be gone by the time I get to look round it, hopefully on Tuesday.
              A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP. - Leonard Nimoy

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Deano's "Diggin It" View Post
                Lady P,

                If your looking at creating raised beds, have a look at these


                Wooden Pallet Collars for Standard Pallets - Pallet Boxes from BiGDUG UK

                It's what I used when I set up mine, and by fastening 3 together make a nice 1m x 2m raised bed.

                [ATTACH=CONFIG]77976[/ATTACH]

                With a bit of wood stain they are ideal, and don't think myself they are overly priced.

                I did however get mine free from a supplier I used to deliver to when I was a truck driver!
                Impressive Deano....Tidy....I like Tidy. Gp
                Never Let the BAD be the Enemy of the GOOD

                Conservation and Preservation for the Future Generation

                Comment


                • #38
                  I used to use pallets but I am now lazy and just buy some treated timber and some stakes, see.
                  https://www.savoytimber.com/timber-s...ng-timber.html
                  Also see
                  http://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gra...ets_43666.html
                  Jimmy
                  Expect the worst in life and you will probably have under estimated!

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Thanks Jimmy. That particular firm doesn't deliver in my area but I'm sure I can find one who does. I don't have the necessary strength to wrestle with dismantling pallets etc, although I may use whole ones for compost bins if I can find some cheap ones.
                    A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP. - Leonard Nimoy

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      That firm cuts things to length but I am sure others will.
                      You need to work out what sizes you need and how many stakes you need and then get them delivered to the lottie.
                      Perhaps a visit to the lumber yard first.

                      If you have a portable electric drill/screwdriver then assmbling them is quite simple.
                      I am sure once you get installed someone would help you with that.
                      Ask around and see what people think on the lottie.
                      Jimmy
                      Expect the worst in life and you will probably have under estimated!

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        As for compost bins palets work Ok.
                        But keep your eyes open, my neighbour threw 2 daliks out which I apropriated.
                        Look on local freecycle
                        Jimmy
                        Expect the worst in life and you will probably have under estimated!

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          First allotment-related purchase completed

                          I know, I know, I haven't got the allotment yet. However one of the first things I am going to need to do is cut down all the rough grass and weeds, which will stop them growing out of control and give me some compostable material. So I've got myself a battery operated lawn mower, which says it works on rough and wet grass. My home lawn mower is tiny, electric, ancient and does a very poor job anyway, so if everything goes pear shaped I can use this one at home. I don't want to get the allotment then have to go out shopping before I can get on with the job!
                          A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP. - Leonard Nimoy

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Penellype View Post
                            First allotment-related purchase completed

                            I know, I know, I haven't got the allotment yet. However one of the first things I am going to need to do is cut down all the rough grass and weeds, which will stop them growing out of control and give me some compostable material. So I've got myself a battery operated lawn mower, which says it works on rough and wet grass. My home lawn mower is tiny, electric, ancient and does a very poor job anyway, so if everything goes pear shaped I can use this one at home. I don't want to get the allotment then have to go out shopping before I can get on with the job!
                            Pen'
                            Your Enthusiasm is infectious(in a nice way Lol)
                            I think Ive already caught it.
                            cant wait for Tuesday to hear the 'Final Countdown'
                            Gp
                            Never Let the BAD be the Enemy of the GOOD

                            Conservation and Preservation for the Future Generation

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Good Luck and hope all goes well with your allotment 'Look round' today.
                              Gp
                              Never Let the BAD be the Enemy of the GOOD

                              Conservation and Preservation for the Future Generation

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Good luck, Penellype. Hope it all goes well today.
                                Living in north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep.

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