Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Today I harvested 2020

Collapse

This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • annie8
    replied
    More raspberries, a few leeks and some herbs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nicos
    replied
    Kale and broccoli ... lambs lettuce, raspberries and the last of our strawberries ( agáin!!!! )

    Leave a comment:


  • Bren In Pots
    replied
    Yesterday kale, carrots and raspberries.

    today's will be mixed lettuce, land cress, spring onions and toms.

    Leave a comment:


  • ameno
    replied
    Some apples.
    A load of tenderstem broccoli
    Kale
    A few peppers
    5 semi-ripe tomatoes which I must have missed before (I pulled up and composted my outdoor tomato plants today)

    Also collected a big bag of chestnuts from nearby.
    Last edited by ameno; Yesterday, 03:31 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • peanut
    replied
    Picked the last of my tomatoes, discovered a little cucumber, which was nice.
    I still have some Sweet Peppers ripening and my first single Cayenne has finally ripened!

    Leave a comment:


  • Chippy Minton
    replied
    2 sweet peppers, one tiny aubergine, a couple of San Marzano toms - added to some stored onion and garlic and a pasta sauce was forthcoming

    Leave a comment:


  • Bren In Pots
    replied
    Assorted lettuce, spring onions, Toms and raspberries.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nicos
    replied
    An oak leaf lettuce for my salad tonight.

    Leave a comment:


  • ameno
    replied
    Originally posted by Nicos View Post
    plus a tiny watermelon the size of my fist. Strangely the flesh was very edible.
    Also a tiny melon...again a couple of heaped tablespoons of delish yellow flesh.
    Deffo not worth all the watering over the summer.
    You did better than me. I had two tiny goose egg-sized watermelons.
    They were quite edible and tasty, though, just as you found.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bren In Pots
    replied
    Yesterday I picked, toms, raspberries, parsnips, carrots, kale and runner beans.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nicos
    replied
    Taken all the Patti squash now plus a tiny watermelon the size of my fist. Strangely the flesh was very edible.
    Also a tiny melon...again a couple of heaped tablespoons of delish yellow flesh.
    Deffo not worth all the watering over the summer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nicos
    replied
    Today we picked the very last strawberries of the year.
    They were incredibly sweet too!

    Leave a comment:


  • ameno
    replied
    French beans
    A kilogram of peppers
    All of the remaining outdoor tomatoes (most are at least starting to change colour; I shall ripen them indoors)
    More beans for drying
    Autumn rhubarb (accidentally pulled the growing point out with one of the stalks. That's the third time I've done that now).

    Leave a comment:


  • Bonjour
    replied
    Originally posted by ameno View Post

    I grew three plants outdoors through black plastic last year, and got 5kg between them. That's about the yield I'm hoping for this time, although more would be a bonus.
    I'll be digging the outdoor ones at the end of October. I have three in large pots in my conservatory, which I shall probably leave until late November.

    As for curing, I've grown them for three years now (although never in this quantity), and every year I have just laid them out in a single layer in trays in my kitchen, on top of the kitchen cupboards... and just left them there.
    The small ones last a couple months before they start shrivelling up (although they never rot), so use those first, and the larger ones (even ones with spade wounds where I dug them up) lasted firm and unblemished (although they did begin to sprout) until I used the last of them in March.
    My kitchen probably matches the humidity requirements, but obviously temperatures are more like 21c than 29c.
    It shows you don't have to worry too much about matching the "ideal" temperature, though. I think the important thing is to store them somewhere humid and at room temperature. They are a tropical crop, after all, so cool temperatures like an outhouse or a fridge will only encourage the tubers to rot.
    Many thanks Ameno. Good tip about using the small ones first. we'll also use up the few we broke the ends off quite quickly too. I'll shove them up on top of the kitchen cupboards for a week or two to cure then. I believe they are best stored cool and dark after the curing stage, so they'll be wrapped in newspaper in cardboard boxes in the spare room.

    Leave a comment:


  • ameno
    replied
    Originally posted by Bonjour View Post

    Good luck with your harvest, you may be pleasantly surprised too!

    How do you go about curing yours? Most info I can find says 85F (29C) and 80% humidity for 10 days, which I don't see how I can provide for the amount I have. I've picked the best ones and put them in my propagator with a heat mat underneath, so they should be somewhere near that. The rest are currently taking their chances laid out in the unheated greenhouse with outdoor temperatures around 14 day and 9 at night.
    I grew three plants outdoors through black plastic last year, and got 5kg between them. That's about the yield I'm hoping for this time, although more would be a bonus.
    I'll be digging the outdoor ones at the end of October. I have three in large pots in my conservatory, which I shall probably leave until late November.

    As for curing, I've grown them for three years now (although never in this quantity), and every year I have just laid them out in a single layer in trays in my kitchen, on top of the kitchen cupboards... and just left them there.
    The small ones last a couple months before they start shrivelling up (although they never rot), so use those first, and the larger ones (even ones with spade wounds where I dug them up) lasted firm and unblemished (although they did begin to sprout) until I used the last of them in March.
    My kitchen probably matches the humidity requirements, but obviously temperatures are more like 21c than 29c.
    It shows you don't have to worry too much about matching the "ideal" temperature, though. I think the important thing is to store them somewhere humid and at room temperature. They are a tropical crop, after all, so cool temperatures like an outhouse or a fridge will only encourage the tubers to rot.

    Leave a comment:

Latest Topics

Collapse

Recent Blog Posts

Collapse
Working...
X