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Tomato seed sowing experiment

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  • Tomato seed sowing experiment

    Last Sunday (6 days ago) I bought some yellow stickered Angelle toms from Morries for my Mum - as she likes small toms as they're easy to eat. Of course, I had to try them myself and they were delicious.
    There were Angelle seeds in last year's Tom Seed Circle (from Paulie), so I decided to sow a few (probably on Tuesday - 4 days ago). Into another pot, I scraped the seeds from a fresh tomato. Put both pots in the propagator.

    What do you think will happen/happened?

  • #2
    You now have lots of tomato seedling.
    I'm on the fence as too them being the same or not
    https://m.facebook.com/Isle-of-Mull-...9854614879285/

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    • #3
      Paulie's came up first. No real idea, but I imagine this to be the case because the seeds were fully mature. On the other hand, if that had happened, you wouldn't have asked the question. Maybe I need a lie-down!
      Living in north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep.

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      • #4
        I think they will grow but be all different due to being an F2 seed.
        there is a chance that they have cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) but I think its less common in tomatoes.
        Sincerely
        Steve
        I live with autism spectrum disorder. Please be gentle. Sincerely Steve.

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        • #5
          The circle seeds were saved from plants grown last summer, from seed saved from shop-bought Angelle tomatoes; I thought they were delicious too. They grew true for me. Good luck with them!
          Last edited by Paulie; 18-05-2019, 04:54 PM.

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          • #6
            I think you'll end up with some nice tasting toms and your Mum will be very happy.

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            • #7
              You all seem confident that the fresh seeds, scraped from a tomato will grow.

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              • #8
                I've heard it said that you can produce seedlings simply by covering a slice of tomato with compost. I've never tried it myself, and I always understood that the gel coating on tomato seeds inhibited germination - hence the need to ferment the seeds in water to remove the coating. So it'll be interesting to see how the experiment goes...

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                • #9
                  Shall I tell you??

                  Paulie's seeds had germinated last night, the scraped ones this morning.
                  When they're a little more advanced I'll take a photo, at the moment you'd need a magnifying glass!!

                  I was surprised that there was so little difference in germination times. I'll keep growing them, side by side, and see how they develop.

                  Try it with your next tomato and keep me company.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Paulie View Post
                    I've heard it said that you can produce seedlings simply by covering a slice of tomato with compost. I've never tried it myself, and I always understood that the gel coating on tomato seeds inhibited germination - hence the need to ferment the seeds in water to remove the coating. So it'll be interesting to see how the experiment goes...
                    Last year I accidentally trod on a fallen tom in my GH thought I'd picked it all up but a week or so later I had a forest of toms seedlings it was late in the season so i didn't bother potting any on.

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                    • #11
                      Vc I now have the urge to sow freshly scooped out tomatoe seeds, or a slice, Im trying to resist

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                      • #12
                        Click image for larger version

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                        Here they are now - scraped on the left, Paulie's on the right.

                        Look how many grew from one little tomato!

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                        I'll be potting them up and planting a couple of each, side by side in the GH.

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                        • #13
                          They look great and a decent size too, Ive got some tomatoe volunteers up from last year, but they are much smaller. Your tomatoe plants are really going for it

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                          • #14
                            Click image for larger version

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                            Here they are - a tangled mess in the GH. My fault as I didn't stake them or tie them into anything as I had more tomatoes on the shelf behind that I needed to access.

                            There has been no noticeable difference between the ones sown from Paulie's saved seeds (at the far end) and those scraped from a fresh tomato (closest the camera).
                            I grew 3 plants of each.

                            The toms are delicious. Their only failing may be that they fall off the trusses when ripe. I'll definitely grow them again next year - and my Mum loves them.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Paulie View Post
                              I've heard it said that you can produce seedlings simply by covering a slice of tomato with compost. I've never tried it myself, and I always understood that the gel coating on tomato seeds inhibited germination - hence the need to ferment the seeds in water to remove the coating. So it'll be interesting to see how the experiment goes...
                              I did this with piccolo tomatoes, and wouldn't suggest it. They do sprout but by the time it comes to separating them I had trouble pulling them apart. I think the purpose behind fermentation is to allow easier and more precise sowing.

                              bright side, they kinda grew well, except it was a forest of indeterminate tomatoes (I didn't know this at the time)...such a big plant for tiny fruit.

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