Announcement

Collapse

ANNOUNCEMENT - THE GROW SHOW

Allotmenteers! Head to The Grow Show for even more free growing advice, plus discounts and tricks from garden celebrities. What are you waiting for?
See more
See less

Potato growing bags

Collapse

X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Potato growing bags

    I am going to try the offer in Dec GYO for Potato growing bags.
    Has anyone grown in potato bags ?
    and was it a good crop?
    any tips?
    Thanks
    Michael01

  • #2
    anyone ?????

    Comment


    • #3
      I haven't. I prefer to grow mine on the allotment.
      [

      Comment


      • #4
        Dont know if this will help you much but I once grew some tubers in black bin liners. Literally just put some compost in the bottom, planted tubers and topped up with compost as they grew, which gradually filled up and expanded the bin liner.

        The main problem i had was judging how much water to give them. I did add some drainage holes but it always seemed to drain very quickly. Harvest was reasonable and tubers were 'clean', in that no soil was stuck to them and they were free from pest damage.

        Bin bags are not robust enough, did not keep shape well enough but principle is fine.

        If you do try growing in special potato bags I am sure we would appreciate updates as to how you get on.
        Geordie

        Te audire non possum. Musa sapientum fixa est in aure


        Comment


        • #5
          Potato Bags

          The last allotment I was on, potato bags were a common practise and many swore by them. Because of their size you only need to put two tubers in, you do, as Geordie pointed out, have to watch the watering with them, give them a good drenching but don't let them get water logged (they shouldn't do as the bags drain well). Growers on the plot use to make a small fence around them with bamboo to stop the foliage from flopping over in the wind and taking the bag. They always got good results and it was less back breaking and you didn't miss potatoes which stayed in the ground to give you a surprise crop next year!

          I would also suggest bins, plastic, with good drainage holes. Cara grows well in bins. I know kestrel did well in bags but some potatoes can bit hit and miss in potato bags.

          Andrewo
          Best wishes
          Andrewo
          Harbinger of Rhubarb tales

          Comment


          • #6
            If bin bags are too thin, what about compost bags? They are usually of fairly thick plastic and its some good free recycling in the process. I use environmentally friendly biodegradable black bin bags and im guessing that they wouldnt do to well outside for a long period of time. However, having never grown potatoes im only guessing at all of this. Good luck, let us know how the bags go.

            Comment


            • #7
              Compost bag potatoes

              Being my first year I didn't want to waste anything, so when I found I have 10 or so seed potatoes extra after planting, I just popped some top soil in the bottom of some empty compost bags and put them in, one per bag. Covered them over and gave them a quick watering. I put them at the back of the compost heaps and apart from watering them a handful of times over the summer (they did get forgotten about I must admit) they got very little attention.

              They were the last to be "dug up" and only then by one bag at a time. Each bag provided a few meals so I was happy, especially with the lack of care that they got. I've kept the compost bags as the plastic is quite strong and may come in handy. I could even give them a good clean out and do the same next year, as I'd like to grow more varieties of tatties and I'm bound to have some left over.

              You could even keep the left over seed potatoes cool and plant them late on to get new potatoes towards Xmas. I only get space in a polytunnel at the start and end of the season so might try this as they are quite portable in the bags.

              The more care you give the veg the better they will probably be, but like weeds , they can often fend quite well for themselves !
              Dave

              Do what you enjoy, or learn to enjoy what you do - life is too short.

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi Michael,

                Most Veg show people grow potatoes in bags for the reason Geordie said, they are clean. I've grown earlies in black plastic flower buckets before and they were a great success, so much so my two kids now eat new potatoes! I think it's because they don't have to peel them so I'm having to grow 2 rows on the lottie and the extra earlies in pots.
                ntg
                Never be afraid to try something new.
                Remember that a lone amateur built the Ark.
                A large group of professionals built the Titanic


                ==================================================

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have just read an article about a man who grows over 600 different varieties of potatoes. 500 varieties in his back garden and two friends grow the rest. He can't grow them in the soil because he grows in the same place each year so he uses black bags. Harvesting is simple just empty out a bag and you have potatoes with none being stabbed by the fork. It sounds a good way to grow them.
                  [

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I read that as well, mind you, he's sadder than the rest of us
                    ntg
                    Never be afraid to try something new.
                    Remember that a lone amateur built the Ark.
                    A large group of professionals built the Titanic


                    ==================================================

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      How does he manage to eat all those potatoes?
                      [

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I planted some Charlotte potatoes in compost bags in autumn, hoping for a small Christmas crop. They grew away quickly and produced good haulms. Sadly I then forgot about them! So the haulms died off. I presume I should have taken them under cover when it got cold?

                        I did still leave them until Christmas and managed to get about 10 small new potatoes! Not enough for Christmas dinner, but I will be using them as seed to try the compost bag experiment again, this time for extra earlies rather than extra lates - maybe spending the cooler months in the greenhouse this time!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          do you have to bother earthing up?

                          sounds interesting this bag business do you have to fill bag up with muck while they are growing or just use bag as same principle what sort do best your best advice please? what sort of compost al purpose do or out of compost bin do they need some grow more mixed in?

                          Cheers pk

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I grow my potatos in big pots (6ocm high x 50cm a cross), very cheap from Asda (£2-£3). The potatos were amazing very heavy yield everyone was perfect, you just keep adding more compost till the pots full!! the best part though has to be harvesting them because I just tip the pot upside down and there they all are!! Plus they made a lovely hedge at the end of my patio

                            I would definately recommed it!!
                            Last edited by Elmo; 27-01-2006, 01:51 PM.
                            Wife, mother, reader, writer, digger so much to do so little time to do it! Follow me on Twitter @digdigdigging

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              NSBL. Put three inches of compost in the bottom of the bag then put two inches of manure or rich rotted home compost in. Next add two inches of garden soil. On top of this seven inches of layers you place two or three potatoes depending on how big the bag is. Put four inches of soil/compost mix on top of the potatoes. Water well.
                              When the stalks and leaves of the potato start to stand a few inches proud of the soil in the bag, top up the bag with a few more inches of soil/compost and keep repeating this every time the stalks and leaves grow taller. Soon the bag will be full to the top and then you just wait for your potatoes to grow to harvest.
                              Jax

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Recent Blog Posts

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X