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  • Hello all Newbie signing on!

    Hi all,

    I Signed up for an allotment about 2 years ago now and I have just had the call that one is available for mr to look at next week ,

    I have no idea on size or state of it as yet but feeling like a kid in a sweet shop but also nervous with anticipation. I am totally new to the world of veg growing so hopefully the start of a long journy ahead,

    No doubt I will be on here asking stupid questions so apologies in advance but looking forward to it,

    Regards

    Trev

  • #2
    Welcome and I hope your allotment gives you lots of enjoyment.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Trev - and Welcome to the Vine

      I know exactly how you feel - bet you can’t stop grinning!

      Ask away , there are no stupid questions on here - we’re all happy to help because we have all appreciated helpful advise from others when we started out too!
      It’s a learning curve and we’re all learning new things as we go along as well as having a bit of fun banter.
      Be aware - you won’t generally get a unanimous answer as we all have slightly different growing environments and what works for one doesn’t for someone else.
      You’ll soon get the feel for your plot though

      so…ask away!

      And the answer to your first question might well be “ a folding chair , a pen and paper and a flask of something hot”

      "Nicos, Queen of Gooooogle" and... GYO's own Miss Marple

      Location....Normandy France

      Comment


      • #4
        Hello and welcome to the vine Trev there's lots of info here on the forum find a comfy chair and have a browse.
        Location....East Midlands.

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        • #5
          Hi, Trev, and welcome to the site. Getting hold of an allotment is great - so many things you could grow on it...
          • Before you go and buy lots of seeds from the big name suppliers, you might want to have a look at some of the posts on here that mention some of the less well-known companies that produce good seed but at a much reduced price.
          • If your allotment is in good condition (and you've planned what you want to put where), you might want to consider planting raspberries, blackberries, blackcurrants etc shortly - late autumn is a good time to do that.
          • Depending on which part of the country you're in, garlic could go in now too (wait for spring if you're in a very high rainfall area).
          Anyway, congratulations on getting your allotment and have fun looking at all the possibilities for what you could grow.

          Comment


          • #6
            Welcome aboard Trev!!
            Nestled somewhere in the Cambridgeshire Fens. Good soil, strong winds and a Giant Puffball!
            Always aim for the best result possible not the best possible result

            Forever indebted to Potstubsdustbins

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            • #7
              Welcome to the Vine Trev,
              nice to meet you!
              sigpic

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              • #8
                Thanks for the welcome all,

                This is probably a can of worms i am about to open but... whats your thoughs on the no dig method? watched charles dowding on youtube and thought he put a good case for it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hello welcome to the forum I hope the allotment visit goes well!
                  Location : Essex

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                  • #10
                    Welcome to the forum.
                    I got a plot a couple of years ago.
                    My plot was covered in couch grass and mugwort.
                    I built a giant raised bed out of blocks of local brick making clay and put all the weed roots in and emptied a latrine I made into it and covered the lot with horse manure. I got a good crop of winter squashes in a thin top layer of top soil. The weed roots got pickled.
                    Have a look at what others are growing and ask where they get seeds from locally.
                    Near Worksop on heavy clay soil

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hi Trev, welcome to The Vine and congratulations on being offered an allotment.

                      Originally posted by Trev-P View Post
                      This is probably a can of worms i am about to open but... whats your thoughs on the no dig method? watched charles dowding on youtube and thought he put a good case for it.
                      Maybe take a good look at your plot before making firm decisions on which way to tackle it. The no-dig method works best if the surface is flat to start with otherwise any lumps of earth will break surface through the mulch before the end of the season. It also takes a lot of mulch to cover, especially when setting up and you might want to check beneath the surface for debris (lumps of concrete, bricks, carpet etc) before putting it down. That said, I'm convinced it's a better way to garden and care for the soil, and practice it across the whole of our 500 square metre allotment. Having spent a number of years digging the plot over, no-dig for me is now a no-brainer. We'll be going into our 7th year and still every year seems to get better and better.
                      Good luck with it and keep us posted how you get on.

                      Location ... Nottingham

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hello and welcome, Trev. This next week will seem like a long time, I bet.

                        This is a great time to take over a plot. There are some things you could sow or plant now. But it also gives you plenty of time to get ready for spring. Much better than getting a plot in April and constantly playing catch-up.

                        Also, you might be in luck and already have some fruit trees, rhubarb, asparagus or other permanent plants or even a greenhouse, shed or compost bay or bin left by the previous tenant. When you visit, definitely take some photos or drawings and note down details of anything that's there, access to water, allotment site club or shop for joint seed and compost purchases, things like that.

                        As others have said, all questions are welcome here, no matter how stupid you think them. For sure they're not if you feel the need to ask them. I learn a lot I didn't even know I needed to learn till other people asked. So fire away.

                        I'm a half dig, half no-dig kind of gardener. But that's because of my weather conditions and the kind of mulch I can get here. I'm certainly expecting to dig less as I go on. Some of Charles Dowding's techniques have really worked for me. Putting down cardboard has not, as the climate and ground are too dry where I am. Hence the saying that all gardening is local.

                        Hope the visit goes well. Best wishes for lots of fun and a great time ahead of you.
                        Location: north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep. Last frost: usually mid-April, sometimes first week in May. First frost: mid-October.

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                        • #13
                          so I am guessing the number 1 rule with a plot is its access to the sun, so not stuck under tree's and other shade and then its aspect to that whether its north or south facing, its taken 2 years to get to this point of being offered a site If i turn it down would it bump me to the bottom of the list again?

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                          • #14
                            You might even be lucky and have a choice of plots, with COVID gardeners packing it in to go back to their old ways?

                            I would take whatever is offered. It won't be all bad, if there are shady parts you can still grow like raspberries or salads.

                            The one thing I would check out before taking it is access to water. If you'll have to lug cans from dip tanks 50 yards away you might find that a bit wearing.
                            Good luck and let us know how it went!
                            My gardening blog: In Spades, last update 30th April 2018.
                            Chrysanthemum notes page here.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The perfect plot may never come up. You're likely to find some good things and some bad things. You'll have to weigh up pros and cons to come to a decision. Shade across a bit of the plot isn't an absolute deal-breaker in my view. Some people even deliberately create shade in summer so they can grow lettuce, as Martin H says.

                              Water is key, as Martin points out. Easy access when you need it, but no waterlogging during rainy spells.
                              Location: north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep. Last frost: usually mid-April, sometimes first week in May. First frost: mid-October.

                              Comment

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