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  • Re starting home brewing

    I haven't made any wine or cider for ages, so I intend to do something about it, all the gear will have to be sterilised first then wine making begins, I guess with so much cheap booze about I have just got out of the habit of making my own. Carrot Whisky is one I've not tried before and it looks like there will be a good crop of Blackberries this year too.
    If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

  • #2
    Ooohh, I'd be interested to hear the mixes etc. Mr Shortie and I very rarely drink so it's not something I'd take time to do, but am interested to hear how it works and favours etc
    Last edited by Shortie; 13-07-2020, 01:00 PM.
    Shortie

    "There are only two lasting bequests we can hope to give our children; one of these is roots, the other wings" - Hodding Carter

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    • #3
      Remember the famous Rhubarb Schnapps????

      https://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gr...apps#post32508
      "Nicos, Queen of Gooooogle" and... GYO's own Miss Marple

      Location....Normandy France

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      • #4
        Bramble wine
        4lbs of berries(ripe0
        A bag(kilo) of sugar
        1 lemon
        1 camden tablet
        1 tea spoon pectin enzyme
        1 gallon of water
        yeast
        yeast nutrient
        wash berries, crush them and place in a fermenting vessel(I have a bucket with a lid and a hole for an air lock) cover with 6 pints of boiling water. When cool and the camden tablet(crushed), pectin enzyme and leave for 24 hours(you could use a large bowl covered with a tea towel.
        Boil 2 pints of water and dissolve the sugar in it, cool to blood heat(no I don't know either) add to the blackberries along with yeast, nutrient and the lemon, cover and let it ferment for 3 days, stirring daily.
        Strain the liquid into a demi john and fit an air lock and ferment out. Finally siphon the clear liquid into dark bottles and keep for around 6 months before drinking.
        If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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        • #5
          Haha, how could I forget the rhubarb schnapps - I don't remember if I made any - I remeber I experimented with some flavouring of vodka.

          OOohh Bramble wine sounds lovely... can you actually taste the fruit in the end result though?
          Shortie

          "There are only two lasting bequests we can hope to give our children; one of these is roots, the other wings" - Hodding Carter

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Shortie View Post
            Haha, how could I forget the rhubarb schnapps - I don't remember if I made any - I remeber I experimented with some flavouring of vodka.

            OOohh Bramble wine sounds lovely... can you actually taste the fruit in the end result though?
            I made bramble wine two years ago. You can definitely smell the blackberries, but I'm not so sure you can taste them. I think the general "wine" flavour overpowers them.
            It's the same story with the elderflower wine (proper wine, not "champagne") I made. It smells of elderflowers, but you can't really taste them.

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            • #7
              I used to make an excellent rhubarb wine, but it sets off the arthritis, so it's off the menu now.
              If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ameno View Post

                I made bramble wine two years ago. You can definitely smell the blackberries, but I'm not so sure you can taste them. I think the general "wine" flavour overpowers them.
                It's the same story with the elderflower wine (proper wine, not "champagne") I made. It smells of elderflowers, but you can't really taste them.
                Aaahhh, that's a shame. I'm sure it's still lovely wine, but I'd want to taste the fruit as well as smell it
                Shortie

                "There are only two lasting bequests we can hope to give our children; one of these is roots, the other wings" - Hodding Carter

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                • #9
                  The brambles are flowering like mad here. With all the water still about the place, I'm expecting a bumper crop of juicy berries. Most year's they're dry and pippy, but would like to make the most of them this year. But, what I like more than anything else about blackberries is blackberry liqueur (crme de mre in French). But the recipes I've seen online don't look like what I was expecting: essentially, crush blackberries and add wine and vodka or gin. Does that sound right?
                  Living in north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep.

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                  • #10
                    I've never made alcho pops, but I believe some sugar is also often added to taste Snoop. I understand from my brother that Sloe gin is basically sloes just pickled in Gin, so I guess the same might work with other fruits.
                    If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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                    • #11
                      ^Thanks, burnie. Not much to be lost just giving it a try, I guess.
                      Living in north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep.

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                      • #12
                        I am reminded by the current glut of tomatoes that I read a recipe for " a pleasant Rose type" wine from said fruit, so I made some. Now CJJ Berry also said you can make wine out of any fruit "except God forbid tomatoes", Berry was right, you could put it on your chips but you couldn't drink it, I also put Lettuce wine in the same category.................................yuk.
                        If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by burnie View Post
                          I am reminded by the current glut of tomatoes that I read a recipe for " a pleasant Rose type" wine from said fruit, so I made some. Now CJJ Berry also said you can make wine out of any fruit "except God forbid tomatoes", Berry was right, you could put it on your chips but you couldn't drink it, I also put Lettuce wine in the same category.................................yuk.
                          You could trying letting your tomato wine turn to vinegar. Tomato wine vinegar might be quite nice.

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