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  • Can anyone identifying these please

    Just found lots of these in last years pots through out the compostand a bit worried, found not all together but spread out and lots of them pots had onions, celery, turnips in, can't find anything on Internet that looks the same

  • #2
    The photo is a bit blurred (although that may just be my eyesight ) but they look like leatherjackets? Maybe check them against this picture
    https://www.amentsoc.org/insects/glo...leather-jacket

    Someone may come along with more info hopefully.
    East Berkshire

    There are no gardening mistakes, only experiments.

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    • #3
      Looks like a kind of little fly pupa,is that 4mm? Bit small for crane fly I don’t know?
      Location : Essex

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Jungle Jane View Post
        Looks like a kind of little fly pupa,is that 4mm? Bit small for crane fly I don’t know?
        No, that's 4/16 of an inch.
        I think you're right about fly pupae, though. They're definitely pupae of some sort, anyway.
        Definitely not crane fly pupae, though. Those are the same size as leather jackets, and look rather like a sort of fossilised leather jacket.

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        • #5
          Could they be Vine weevil pupae.
          Location ... Nottingham

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Mr Bones View Post
            Could they be Vine weevil pupae.
            No, vine weevil pupae, like most beetle pupae, have noticeable (albeit non-functional) legs).

            Those sorts of featureless tubes with horizontal banding are almost always the pupae of true fly species of some sort.

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            • #7
              They’re not some sort of onion fly overwintering I hope? Did you have any little maggots in any of the onions you grew last year? If you didn’t then it probably isn’t them.
              Location : Essex

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              • #8
                Allium leaf miner pupae? They pupate in the soil apparently.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Purple Primrose View Post
                  Allium leaf miner pupae? They pupate in the soil apparently.
                  Ally miner pupae are dark reddish brown, about 3mm long and more sausage shaped rather than plump

                  Found a link to the RHS https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=643
                  Last edited by Mr Bones; 02-04-2021, 06:46 AM. Reason: Add RHS link
                  Location ... Nottingham

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for all the advice it is much appreciated, I’m thinking they are onion fly eggs now, luckily in pots so all compost is getting double bagged then in the bin I’m thinking.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by hodgieduje View Post
                      Thanks for all the advice it is much appreciated, I’m thinking they are onion fly eggs now, luckily in pots so all compost is getting double bagged then in the bin I’m thinking.
                      Those are not anything eggs. They are far too large.
                      They could be onion fly pupae, though. Onion fly pupae are usually darker than that, but colours can vary.

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                      • #12
                        No matter how disgusting it is, I would stock up on insecticides, because many insects can feed on your plantings. It's like weeds - you need to fight right away to save the harvest and at the same time so that by the time of harvest, the toxins are destroyed and the products are safe. I already have BioAdvanced (the description of this product is here https://homemakerguide.com/best-inse...ler-for-lawns/) in my garage. I buy every year in advance.

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                        • #13
                          Eggs, pupa and larvae make good wild bird food. Spread the compost out on a piece of plastic outside, and your local robin will sort it out.

                          Remember please that there is no such place as 'away' - so throwing things away just means moving whatever it is somewhere-else - we only have one world.
                          Last edited by nickdub; 12-04-2021, 12:33 PM.

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