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  • Sparrows and dunnock ID

    For NannyGreen ( and me as I hadn't a clue either) and anyone else who has wondered....

    https://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gr...ne#post2520780

    Dunnock....
    https://www.bto.org/our-science/proj...-birds/dunnock


    Tree and house sparrow...
    https://scottishwildlifetrust.org.uk...-tree-sparrow/
    Last edited by Nicos; 24-03-2021, 01:46 PM.
    "Nicos, Queen of Gooooogle" and... GYO's own Miss Marple

    Location....Normandy France

  • #2
    Thank you Nicos , they are all so similar aren't they? Even with my binoculars I am still not sure I will see the differences. Anyway, pleased I managed to get the Birdwatch right as I put them down as house sparrows
    East Berkshire

    There are no gardening mistakes, only experiments.

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    • #3
      I admire people who can easily ID similar birds.
      Maybe it’s something I should try and concentrate on over the summer
      "Nicos, Queen of Gooooogle" and... GYO's own Miss Marple

      Location....Normandy France

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      • #4
        Learning their calls and songs helps and also the way they fly, the habitat they are in also helps.

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        • #5
          Click image for larger version

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          House Sparrows

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          • #6
            Another way to tell Dunnocks from Sparrows is their beaks. Sparrows have thick chunky beaks for crunching seeds etc, Dunnocks thin little beaks for little insects.
            Sparrows are often seen in groups of males and females in shrubs etc, Dunnocks tend to be on the ground, alone or a pair.
            Nestled somewhere in the Cambridgeshire Fens. Good soil, strong winds and a Giant Puffball! https://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gr...lies/smile.gif
            Always aim for the best result possible not the best possible result
            https://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gr...lies/smile.gif
            Forever indebted to Potstubsdustbinshttps://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gr...lies/smile.gif

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            • #7
              I might try listening to the calls burnie although I'm not that good with identifying names of tunes, I know the the ones I hear commonly in the garden like the blackbird and robin, oh yes, and the flipping pigeons. After that it gets a bit fluffy but I probably stand more chance of identifying a song as the eyesight ain't what it was

              Which is why peanut your description of beaks is hugely helpful but would be hard for me and my binoculars And they are all so quick......
              East Berkshire

              There are no gardening mistakes, only experiments.

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              • #8
                I often get dunnocks in the garden. Their shape is more like a robin and look out for the grey chest. Also they are ground feeders so you wouldn’t see them on nut feeders really but you might see them below I guess picking up discarded seeds.
                Last edited by annie8; 24-03-2021, 08:18 PM.

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                • #9
                  I thought the bird I saw had a proper grey chest annie8 hence the original question (the original picture is on the other thread - sorry haven't worked out how to link to it yet). It was sitting in the hedge having collected nesting material and checking for marauders I suspect. My eyesight is not so good and I use binoculars usually but my video camera was to hand so I zoomed in to see what it was.

                  Now I have half an idea what to look for I shall be watching the border under the hedge, a favourite haunt of the blackbirds and robins. I wasn't disappointed to find out it was a house sparrow until people started saying they had them in their garden - now I want them

                  Mod note.... photo link added ...
                  https://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gr...ne#post2520776
                  Last edited by Nicos; 25-03-2021, 02:52 AM.
                  East Berkshire

                  There are no gardening mistakes, only experiments.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by annie8 View Post
                    I often get dunnocks in the garden. Their shape is more like a robin and look out for the grey chest. Also they are ground feeders so you wouldn’t see them on nut feeders really but you might see them below I guess picking up discarded seeds.
                    The dunnocks in my garden (and the robins too) have learned how to take sunflower hearts from the feeders, but only when there are no other birds around.
                    Location - Leicestershire - Chisit-land
                    Endless wonder.

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                    • #11
                      Aren't they lovely to watch mothhawk ? My hedge feeder has a mix of seed, suet and mealworms much loved by the blue tits but the robins will also get in there although, as you say, only when no-one else is around.

                      I had to make some seed catchers for my main feeders as I had a rat problem last summer and during the snow the robin found the discards very appetising, much to the annoyance of the tits


                      Click image for larger version

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                      Click image for larger version

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                      East Berkshire

                      There are no gardening mistakes, only experiments.

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                      • #12
                        NG...I’ve just added the photo link to your previous post.

                        (click on the number of the post and copy and paste the link code)
                        Last edited by Nicos; 25-03-2021, 02:55 AM.
                        "Nicos, Queen of Gooooogle" and... GYO's own Miss Marple

                        Location....Normandy France

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yes Mothhawk the robin that spends lots of time in my garden has managed to find a way to get onto the feeder tooalthough it struggles to stay on for long. It then takes a few seeds back to the wall behind and eats them there. It’s spending loads of time at the feeder and the moment and gets quick put out when the other birds have a turn. Have only seen the dunnocks on the feeder once, they are usually below catching what falls from the other birds. Think the style of feeder I have lends itself to the tits and finches as the perching space isn’t big. Just been watching it and the pair of bull finches are back. I use a mix of sunflower seeds and Nyger, to attract interesting birds and also the squirrels aren’t so keen on the nyger and they are a pest.
                          Nanny green agree with others the original pic is a sparrow, the dunnocks often appear more of a mid grey on the chest to me and I certainly find them to be a much rounder shape. I get very few sparrows in my garden as I haven’t got the kid of hedging/shrubs they like ( but working on it.) so am always delighted when I do see one.

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                          • #14
                            Well annie8 I am resigned to having sparrows and in truth I love them lots. Don't know about you but I can spend ages just watching them. A dunnock or two would just be lovely.

                            I am looking forward now to sparrow fledging time and watching their antics, they are so funny leaping around investigating everything. My primroses and violas always take a hit as they insist on pulling all the flowers off but it is way better than TV

                            Edited to add: Thank you Nicos for the linking info, going to try that out.
                            Last edited by NannyGreen; 25-03-2021, 10:45 AM.
                            East Berkshire

                            There are no gardening mistakes, only experiments.

                            Comment

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