Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Removing leaves from tomato plants

Collapse

X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Removing leaves from tomato plants

    Just wondered who removes leaves from their tomatoes and why also is there a reason you should leave them on the plants
    it may be a struggle to reach the top, but once your over the hill your problems start.

    Member of the Nutters Club but I think I am just there to make up the numbers

  • #2
    I remove the lower ones if they become tired looking and as the fruits start to ripen I remove leaves/stems that shade the fruits to let the sun at them. No idea if there's any science behind this, my dad did it and I always have, never killed a plant yet.
    If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

    Comment


    • #3
      Ha . Just as I've pruned mine within an inch of their life.
      I always prune in my 7x5 gh with too many plants to aid air round them ..not killed one yet.
      Living around the wet and windy scottish border, otherwise known as 'no man's land' .

      Comment


      • #4
        I also remove the lower leaves, plus any causing shading on fruit.
        Always aim for the best result possible not the best possible result

        Forever indebted to Potstubsdustbins

        Comment


        • #5
          Same here.
          Take off the lower leaves to improve airflow.
          I also remove any heavy foliage or withering leaves.
          I try to keep a nice open Bush.

          And when your back stops aching,
          And your hands begin to harden.
          You will find yourself a partner,
          In the glory of the garden.

          Rudyard Kipling.sigpic

          Comment


          • #6
            I also remove the lower tired leaves... the plants seem to appreciate it.
            Our DIY and sustainability journey: My Home Farm

            Comment


            • #7
              Me too...for all the above reasons.
              Just the lower ones to start with, then thinning out, then later on to expose the fruit to the sun.
              "Nicos, Queen of Gooooogle" and... GYO's own Miss Marple

              Location....Normandy France

              Comment


              • #8
                I remove leaves below the first truss it makes watering easier, then really late on in the season I reduce leaves by half in the hope more light will get through to ripen the toms.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I remove any leaves that are yellowing and allow me to break them off at the natural join with the stem. I never cut off leaves, having found that this is a great way to introduce botrytis. I should probably add that the greenhouse that I am using for these plants leaks, so when it rains water drips onto the foliage. If you are able to keep the plants themselves dry then botrytis may not be a problem.
                  A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP. - Leonard Nimoy

                  Comment

                  Latest Topics

                  Collapse

                  Recent Blog Posts

                  Collapse
                  Working...
                  X