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  • Greenhouse advice

    Hello everyone, happy January!

    I'm taking the plunge and investing in a sizeable greenhouse, however we have to work around that we are at a reasonably high altitude in North Wales, middle of nowhere on an almost totally exposed site that get extremely high winds and storms many months of the year.

    We have one spot where there is, we think, just enough shelter to erect a greenhouse so long as it is of the very durable variety. but we'd love to know if anyone else has any experience with any make on an exposed site prone to high wind?
    Any feedback or advice very gratefully received!!

    Sarah
    Last edited by burnie; 23-01-2021, 10:18 AM.

  • #2
    Hi, no experience of that make, I live on the exposed coast of NE Scotland and can recommend the Rhino as an alternative.
    If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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    • #3
      Hello and welcome.

      Have a look at this thread from earlier this year. Stormbandit might be able to give you some pointers if you drop in over there.
      https://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gr...es-greenhouses
      Living in north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep.

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      • #4
        One thing which will help on a windy site is to plant a few evergreen shrubs near your boundaries to moderate the strength of the wind. Yew is one possibility.

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        • #5
          You might want to consider a polycrub. They're designed for the kind of storms they get in Shetland so they're certified to cope with a maximum wind speed of 120mph. They're not cheap though. A work colleague of mine is a keen gardener and he has a 4 metre by 4 metre polycrub and reckons it's great. Another friend has recently bought a 3 metre by 3 metre one and loves it. We're in Orkney so anything that's put up has to cope with a decent amount of wind. Force 8 to 9 quite regularly over the winter. Sometimes get force 10 and the occasional force 11. Force 12 a couple of times a year. The polycrubs have coped fine so they're quite popular in Orkney. Can't say that for the glass greenhouse someone had put in - it took off one winter and shattered. Someone else has a dome-shaped greenhouse covered with fishing net held down with rocks and that's been OK. Apparently they've sent polycrubs to people in France and as far away as the Falkland Isles!


          Last edited by burnie; 19-01-2021, 09:17 PM. Reason: Removed advertising link

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          • #6
            Sorry for the link, Burnie. I didn't realise we're not meant use those.

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            • #7
              It's just if the ads are in direct competition with advertisers in the magazine, you can name a company, just let folk go find a link for themselves is perhaps the best way to describe it.
              If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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              • #8
                Ah, that's why. Makes sense to me now.

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                • #9
                  We are 800m in from Atlantic, 140m up on Cornwall"s North Coast and regularly get sustained F8 and occasional F9 winds. Used to lose panes until put up windbreak in pic. Now lose none. Fingers crossed.
                  Distance out is compromise between shadow and protection.
                  I live in a part of the UK with very mild winters. Please take this into account before thinking "if he is sowing those now...."

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                  • #10
                    This is all so helpful thank you everyone! I am looking into windbreaks, polycrub, and Rhino right now We will be planting trees around, but the actual site for the greenhouse itself won't fit more trees. Lets see how this research goes, I love everyone's ideas!!

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                    • #11
                      Have been trying to start a new thread but can not get it to come up.
                      Will post my observations here.
                      I have a 4 square meter greenhouse which gets a lot of sunlight. My first toms are usually ready to eat about the middle to end of June, I give the same plants to my neighbours on each side of me. The one who has an 8x6 greenhouse which gets almost as much sun as mine gets his first toms middle of July right through to end of August. The third neighbour has a greenhouse [ 12 x6 ft.] fitted to a wall of the house which gets the sun only from the middle of the day and are lucky to get much before August BUT they can keep picking until start of October.
                      Never before realised how much different the position of the house makes.
                      Bob.

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                      • #12
                        Hey Bob, that's an awesome experiment - what a huge difference the position makes! I figured it would but that is a very tangible and visible way to see it.

                        I have finally bought a greenhouse! Thanks to everyone's advice I actually was thrilled to manage getting my hands on a second hand Rhino sized 8x18 feet, so cool! It was a marathon job to get it taken down and moved, and we aim to start the ground clearing to lay a concrete pad next month. It will be a huge task as it is going on a flat bank that currently is long matted grass land, so it all needs clearing and then we can dig it, lay the pad and construct. I am
                        super excited to see how my first year in it grows - I've all my seeds for this year and will begin sowing next week

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                        • #13
                          Congrats on getting your GH when you’ve done a few more posts you’ll be able to share pictures with us of your build.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Golgylookinfinch View Post
                            ... I actually was thrilled to manage getting my hands on a second hand Rhino sized 8x18 feet,...
                            won't be big enough once you start I started with an 8x6 then added a 12 x 8 and now I'm putting a 20 x 10 polytunnel up as well

                            Mine used to be perfect - sheltered but loads of light but then my neighbour planted a bloody laurel hedge thats now at about 12 feet high and hanging over the fence ... I think the hedge trimmer will be coming out and I know where I'me going to wash my weedkiller out as well
                            ntg
                            Never be afraid to try something new.
                            Remember that a lone amateur built the Ark.
                            A large group of professionals built the Titanic
                            ==================================================

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