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Gherkin plant!?

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  • Gherkin plant!?

    Hello,

    I have never grown these, they seem to be growing up and have little clusters of balls is this normal?

    ​​​​​​​Thanks

  • #2
    Welcome to the vine, we could do with a bit more information, do you know what type they are, did you grow them from seed yourself? Are they growing in a greenhouse or outside, are they in a pot, if so how big? This will help us to understand their growing condition and whether things are ok or if the plants are under pressure.
    If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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    • #3
      Thanks for replying, they are outside in big wooden sleeper raised bed waist height. They are 4 ft tall, staked.
      Attached Files

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      • #4
        Also, grew them from seeds myself.

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        • #5
          I guess it is a case of feed the plants and see what you get, maybe a seaweed or other tomato feed
          If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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          • #6
            Thank you! I thought that might be the case!

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            • #7
              Keep us posted, I have only pickled small ridge cukes to make gherkins, so I would be interested how you get on.
              If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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              • #8
                Are you sure that’s gherkin,the ball bits look strange,should have yellow flowers I think?

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                • #9
                  I’m afraid that the plants in the photo are definitely not gherkins. I’m not sure exactly what they are. Look a bit like huazontle.
                  Last edited by TrixC; 15-07-2020, 07:31 PM.

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                  • #10
                    That, I'm afraid, is fat hen, a common garden weed.

                    Gherkins, like all cucumber plants, have large (the size of a spread hand or larger) leaves and long trailing (or climbing) stem, all covered in bristles.

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                    • #11
                      Yes I’m with ameno
                      fat hen

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