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  • Feeding/watering tomatoes

    Should I still be feeding my tomatoes once a week. Also read elsewhere that watering should stop, is this correct?

  • #2
    This is a Quote from somewhere:-

    " One tip that I’ve always found helpful, although a little counterintuitive, is to stop watering tomato plants mid to late summer. “Stop watering,” you say. “That’s seems silly.” Here is the reasoning.

    Tomatoes work hard to grow new green foliage all through the growing season. The more water you give the plant (and nutrients), the larger it will continue to grow. As soon as you stop watering the plant, the plant begins to realize that it is coming to the end of the season and begins to focus on producing fruit rather than growing new foliage. When you stop watering the tomato plants, the fruit will ripen quicker too."
    Last edited by veggiechicken; 10-10-2015, 09:22 AM. Reason: Adding that this is a Quote not advice from JMCKG

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    • #3
      Depends on how healthy your plants are. I'm still watering mine as I don't like to see them wilting but some have clearly finished and I don't bother with those. Just trim off the leaves and let the fruit ripen.

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      • #4
        If the foliage is green just give them some water, otherwise its the end of the season for your plants.

        And when your back stops aching,
        And your hands begin to harden.
        You will find yourself a partner,
        In the glory of the garden.

        Rudyard Kipling.sigpic

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        • #5
          Originally posted by JMCKG View Post
          One tip that I’ve always found helpful, although a little counterintuitive, is to stop watering tomato plants mid to late summer. “Stop watering,” you say. “That’s seems silly.” Here is the reasoning.

          Tomatoes work hard to grow new green foliage all through the growing season. The more water you give the plant (and nutrients), the larger it will continue to grow. As soon as you stop watering the plant, the plant begins to realize that it is coming to the end of the season and begins to focus on producing fruit rather than growing new foliage. When you stop watering the tomato plants, the fruit will ripen quicker too.
          Do you do this - and does it work?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by veggiechicken View Post
            Do you do this - and does it work?
            No, just a quote Infound elsewhere.

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            • #7
              Ah, I thought it was your advice, not a quote!
              I'm confused as ever

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              • #8
                Originally posted by veggiechicken View Post
                Ah, I thought it was your advice, not a quote!
                I'm confused as ever
                I'm confused too, the OP said it had been helpful so I too assumed it was based on experience.

                Some of us live in the past, always talking about back then. Some of us live in the future, always planning what we are going to do. And, then there are those, who neither look behind or ahead, but just enjoy the moment of right now.

                Which one are you and is it how you want to be?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Alison View Post
                  I'm confused too, the OP said it had been helpful so I too assumed it was based on experience.
                  I asked for advice in post one. The 3rd post was in reply to post 2, should have put it in "quotes".

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                  • #10
                    I've edited your post and added "Quotes". I'm sure you can see how confusing it was to the rest of us

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                    • #11
                      Mom said to stop watering tomatos once it is started to set the fruit. I assume it is for the tomatos grown outside in the direct soil. not for the one's in containers..

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                      • #12
                        I haven't fed my tomato plants for probably a few months now as I read a number of tips online advising it wasn't necessary after pinching the tops out. The other advice I read was to go easy on the watering at this point as well.

                        Anyway, there's been no problems with mine since doing that. The fruits carried on growing and ripening and haven't yet caught any diseases. So I'm assuming that the advice was fine. Mine have also been growing in containers, probably smaller containers than the recommended advice as they just got placed in what I had handy at the time which were from the 1 shop
                        LOVE growing food to eat in my little town back garden. Winter update: currently growing overwintering onions, carrots, lettuce, chard, salad leaves, kale, cabbage, radish, beetroot, garlic, broccoli raab, some herbs.

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                        • #13
                          Stop watering tomatoes?

                          Been suggested that it's best to stop watering/feeding tomatoes at this time of years as it increases the speed of ripening and produces better tasting fruit. I water and feed right up till the end. Any views on this? Is it nonsense?

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                          • #14
                            I water too although ease off on the feeding as I'm not encouraging more flowers.

                            Some of us live in the past, always talking about back then. Some of us live in the future, always planning what we are going to do. And, then there are those, who neither look behind or ahead, but just enjoy the moment of right now.

                            Which one are you and is it how you want to be?

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                            • #15
                              Plants that are in the ground only get a small amount of water now and no feed.

                              Those that are in pots get more water and the occasional feed but much less than they would get earlier in the year.

                              I work on the basis that if they were outside I couldn't stop them getting watered so some water can't do them any harm.

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