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  • Weed Killer

    Hi

    I have just taken over a full size allotment plot which is covered in grass and weeds. I know the plots has been covered in weed killer to kill the weeds and I was wondeing how long I would have to leave the plot before planting after the weeds have died and the plot has been digged.

    Many thanks
    Bye

    PT

    Carpe Diem

    The way I see it, if you want the rainbow you have got to put up with the rain!


    http://heifer73.blogspot.com/

  • #2
    Just depends on what it has been sprayed with, something like roundup is neutralised as soon as it hits the soil it only kills green stuff, when did the plot get the treatment as it is only useful to spray weeds when they are growing if it has been done this time of year it is a complete waste of time.

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    • #3
      Hi Paul

      It was done at the weekend.
      Bye

      PT

      Carpe Diem

      The way I see it, if you want the rainbow you have got to put up with the rain!


      http://heifer73.blogspot.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi PT I took over my lottie in October 05 & made the mistake of letting council rotovate it.
        Twitch ect cut up but not killed off.
        I found best way getting rid of persistnt weeds is to hand dig the whole plot.
        My plot 330Sq yards+
        Hard work but worth it & no risk of residue weedkiller
        The river Trent is lovely, I know because I have walked on it for 18 years.
        Brian Clough

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        • #5
          I agree bubblewrap. I took on a plot of private land in April 06 and was determined not to spray. We have hand dug and removed all brambles, bindweed etc. Im sure there will be more this spring but will hand dig again.

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          • #6
            With a translocated spray about four weeks. I have a licence to use the potent stuff and the weeds are dead within an hour I then remove the perrenials and dig in the annuals the next day.
            benacre
            http://lowestoftnaturalist-benacre.blogspot.com/

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            • #7
              I'm not at all happy about using chemical sprays for weedkilling or pest control. I know some are licensed, etc and if you use them according to instructions there is supposed to be no risk, but I still want to know what goes onto the food I'm eating. After all if it can kill weeds or pests what will it do to me, my children and grandchildren.

              Also, on the practical side, I've seen plots sprayed with weedkiller - it kills the top growth OK, but if you don't dig the perennial weed roots out they seem to survive and grow even stronger.

              I much prefer digging. OK it's b****y hard work, but it is effective. I took over a plot which was totally overgrown with brambles and docks - chopping down was hard work, and the roots were unbelievable. However, after only 18 months the plot is looking good. There has been some re-growth, but not much, and it is easy to locate the root and remove it. Main problem at the moment is seedling docks, but if you can hand weed when small they are easy to remove. Hopefully the problem will lessen with time and constant cultivation.

              One another note, I have horseradish, I've never seen anything like it. I think it's even worse than docks - I'm beginning to think it should be classified as a weed.
              Last edited by rustylady; 16-01-2007, 07:13 PM. Reason: left a word out

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              • #8
                dig by hand. remove by hand. and enjoy the end result. remember no pain no gain

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                • #9
                  Hi PT! I got my lottie Christmas week. First job was to lay down cardboard on the weeds, then (when I could afford it a couple of weeks later!) have now covered virtually the whole thing (on top of the cardboard) with thick black plastic (from B&Q - around £28 a roll) to kill the weeds.
                  The only way is to dig them out by hand - a hard job, but well worth it in the end - this is what I did in my back garden, and I reaped the results in the summer.
                  Only problem is, with all this wet weather been unable to have a "reet good dig" so hoping this weekend will be better - am itching to get going!
                  Good luck with your lottie - can't wait to hear how you are getting on! DDL
                  Bernie aka DDL

                  Appreciate the little things in life because one day you will realise they are the big things

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                  • #10
                    I agree with everyone, Double digging is the only way My Lottie plot was once part of a field with docks, Brambles and any other nasties you can think of. I dug the first bit without covering it first and that worked but was difficult. The rest I covered before digging and it made life much easier. Its quite amazing what even an ants nest makes to the soil.

                    There has been very little serious regrowth mostly seedlings. However I do have to admit to the very occasional bit of spot treating with roundup on things like bindweed which are impossible to dig out .

                    Best of luck
                    Gardening requires a lot of water - most of it in the form of perspiration. Lou Erickson, critic and poet

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                    • #11
                      I got my plot in Feb & it was a typical untended allotment: it had been routinely Roundupped, but was waist high in dock, horseradish, brambles, couch grass, dandelions, thistles, bindweed. I cut off the top growth to compost or burn, then covered as much of the ground as possible with old carpet to kill the weeds off (although there is now some debate about the toxicity of carpets? - are they compatible with organic gardening?). The roots will survive the carpet treatment, but are significantly weakened, so you need to dig them out. I didn't try to dig the whole plot at once (bad back) but just a small area at a time - which I then planted soon as poss to stop the weeds coming back in. That first summer I had really good crops, too much to eat, even though the plot was only half cleared. Potatoes are especially good for opening up the ground. Within 7 months I had virtually no perennial weeds, and never used a weedkilling spray. I still get annual weed seeds blown in by the wind, but I quite enjoy pulling them out by hand. My top tip would be: don't leave any bare ground... I sow lots of green manures, Nasturtiums and Poached Eggs as ground cover, & remove them as and when I need to plant a crop.

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                      • #12
                        RL, i like your style. Can i ask wether you dig in the nasturtiums and poached eggs or do you dig them up?

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                        • #13
                          Hi Rusty horseradish? All you need now is a cow!
                          The river Trent is lovely, I know because I have walked on it for 18 years.
                          Brian Clough

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