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  • Re-waxing a jacket?

    Has anyone had a go at re-waxing a wax jacket?

    I've washed it in cold water and now waiting for it to dry, while I look at where to get hold of some wax.

    Have read on one site that it's worth warming the tin in hot water and using a paint brush to apply and then a hairdryer, in order for the wax to set.

    So I thought as you are outdoor sort of folk, you might have experience of re-waxing and maybe have a few tips?

  • #2
    The hair drier is to melt the wax into the fabric,I did an old barbour years ago.It rejuvenated the coat,but it was never waterproof again,I now wear goretex as it's far better than waxed cotton.Good luck with yours

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    • #3
      If you go to your local horsewear stockist you can buy spray wax. Much easier. I used some years ago to re-proof a horse rug and it was superb, really waterproof again.

      I don't remember what stuff it was but this sounds similar... http://www.stormwaterproofing.com/in...emart&Itemid=9
      Last edited by shirlthegirl43; 07-12-2010, 04:07 PM.
      Happy Gardening,
      Shirley

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      • #4
        Thanks the spray on waterproofer sounds like a better and hopefully more successful at actually waterproofing, as it sounds a little hit and miss with waxing.

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        • #5
          I use the wax in the tin! Cover table with newspaper, spread garment out on top. Get soft cotton cloth, and dab it in the wax, then rub it, in a circular motion all over the garment, paying particular attention to the wear points. It is just like applying shoe polish, remember, like we were forced to do as kids!?

          I have done two Barbours and a full length Drizabone. Still going strong, and I prefer it to the spray. It does take longer, but I find it more effective. When you're done, just hang the garment somewhere airy but warm, to dry.

          DO remember to take it off before getting in the car - not too bad if you have leather seats, but if they are cloth or velour, you will make a real mess of your seats!

          Have fun!
          All the best - Glutton 4 Punishment
          Freelance shrub butcher and weed removal operative.

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          • #6
            Again I've read about the wax sticking to car seats and stuff, but I thought that was why using a hairdryer was mentioned, to make it stick and dry?

            The idea is to keep it in the lottie shed really, but I've brought it home to wash as I worried it would get damp and smelly if left there over winter.

            It's Regatta just above the knee dark green jacket, I don't know if it's suppose to be that long, but I'm only 5ft and the jacket was passed onto me.

            When looking on sites about waxing, one person said she washes it as normal and no longer bothers to wax it, just uses it as a great outdoor jacket. I did wonder if that might be all I need it for on the lottie, because if the rain comes down heavy, I just pop into the shed.

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            • #7
              I have used both the tin stuff and the spray on barbours and they have never been really waterproof again
              WPC F Hobbit, Shire police

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              • #8
                Originally posted by FionaH View Post
                I have used both the tin stuff and the spray on barbours and they have never been really waterproof again
                Dunno why. I've had no problem - it does take aaaages to do though, but cheaper than a new coat!
                All the best - Glutton 4 Punishment
                Freelance shrub butcher and weed removal operative.

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                • #9
                  I've tried re - waxing jackets a couple of times. It's messy, smelly, sticky, hard work and never seems to be waterproof afterwards. You have to use an iron or a hairdryer to melt the proofing into the fabric, and it has to be pretty hot, not just warm
                  If the jacket is made by Belstaff or Barbours they offer a repair and reproofing service which is certain to be easier and better than doing it yourself. Don't know if they will reproof makes besides their own, you can always ask
                  Goretex and similar fabrics are very good when new, but do eventually leak. There are proofings available, but they don't last very long
                  Try asking the proofing manufacturers such as Nikwax or Grangers. I have found their advice departments very helpful in the past
                  Amongst my hill - going friends, Paramo is very highly thought of - lighter than waxed, but can be reproofed, a sort of modern equivalent of waxed clothing
                  I have reproofed some waxed cloth overmitts with dubbin and similar treatments intended for leather boots and that has been quite successful. It is softer than waxed proofing and seems to penetrate the fabric better, but you still need to melt it in

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                  • #10
                    It does sound like a lot of work and seems to be more folk saying it's never really waterproofed again.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Glutton4... View Post
                      Dunno why. I've had no problem - it does take aaaages to do though, but cheaper than a new coat!
                      Could be cos I am cackhanded and impatient!
                      WPC F Hobbit, Shire police

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by FionaH View Post
                        Could be cos I am cackhanded and impatient!
                        Well when I was researching the process on the web, loads of folk have had problems, so it's likely that it's not an easy process.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Dottie View Post
                          Well when I was researching the process on the web, loads of folk have had problems, so it's likely that it's not an easy process.
                          The jacket needs to be warm put the tin on a hot water bottle and apply the wax with a paint brush.
                          Some dry cleaners do rewaxing but it is expensive.
                          The river Trent is lovely, I know because I have walked on it for 18 years.
                          Brian Clough

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                          • #14
                            Does anyone else always end up with with wax behind their nails when they wear a wax jacket ?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Bren In Pots View Post
                              Does anyone else always end up with with wax behind their nails when they wear a wax jacket ?
                              Nope! And, I wear mine a lot in the winter. It may be thin but it's very warm, and windproof.
                              All the best - Glutton 4 Punishment
                              Freelance shrub butcher and weed removal operative.

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