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Any LED grow light recommendations?

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  • Any LED grow light recommendations?

    I've been thinking about getting an LED grow light so that I can stop the seeds I start off in the porch in spring from getting too leggy before I plant them out.

    It'd also be useful for growing salad leaves indoors over winter. The days up here are so short in mid-winter it'd be quite difficult to grow much indoors without some extra light.

    Has anyone got any suggestions as to which ones work well and which brands to avoid?
    Last edited by Purple Primrose; 07-12-2020, 08:59 PM.

  • #2
    Purple Primrose I don't have grow lights but I have found a couple of older threads for you to look at until someone comes along to answer your question

    https://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gr...istmas-present

    https://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gr...cal-growlights

    Hope this helps

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    • #3
      Thank you, Bren in Pots. Those links are really useful and just what I need.

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      • #4
        I don't use grow lights for plants, but I did for years have a tropical marine invertebrate fish tank with live corals in it and the best were either metal halide of mercury vapour lamps. Now LED technology has moved on a lot since I used those lights, but some seem to be more concerned with brightness rather than the colour band, indeed some of the crofters in the Shetland and Orkney islands used to use blue actinic fluorescent tubes with good results.
        If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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        • #5
          I didn't even realise keeping marine invertebrates and corals alive in a fish tank was possible. Did they need something to replicate the movement of water from the tides or were they OK with still water? Did the invertebrates feed on the corals or vice versa? It sounds like a great hobby and much more interesting to look at than a tank of goldfish.

          Thanks for the information on using blue actinic fluorescent tubes. I hadn't heard of those so I'll add them to my list of things to look up.

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          • #6
            Keeping Marine Invertebrates is a very difficult thing to do, though these days many are now bred in captivity, so less harmful to the environment, it involves a lot of expensive pumps and filters and sterilisers, much changing of water, that requires buying expensive sea salt. I gave up after about 10 years as it was a time consuming hobby with a lot of upkeep and expense. It was fascinating and quite educational watching the tiny animals appearing from the living rock, fish were not very compatible as the ate everything, we had some lovely fan worms in the tank until we bought a Copper Band Butterfly fish and it ate them all!!.
            If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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            • #7
              It sounds like a very enjoyable hobby. Shame about the demise of the fan worms - they're very pretty creatures. I've only ever seen them in the wild when I was a teenager on a field trip somewhere on the south coast of England.

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