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the more I live the less I learn

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  • the more I live the less I learn

    this past winter I was rather chuffed with my overwintering caulies, psb and cabbage, I was particularly smug that my nets protected most of it from a late infestation of cabbage whites. I was still smug when the first snows came and job done I decided to put the nets away to prevent snow damage.

    I should know by now, get smug at your peril, just when you think you have outwitted mother nature she sneaks up on you and bites you on the unmentionables! I will never learn!

    in this instance I went out to examine my brassicas, still half buried in the snow. the pigeons which I didn't know I had, and possibly crows have shredded everything down to the stalks.

    if I ever sound smug again then please smack me on the head

  • #2
    For the first time ever, a lot of my cabbages and caulis have been pecked to shreds. By sparrows of all things!
    Location: north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep. Last frost: usually mid-April, sometimes first week in May. First frost: mid-October.

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    • #3
      I should imagine that, to any hungry birds about, your brassicas looked just like an eat- as-much-as-you-can buffet displayed on a white tablecloth

      They probably thought you were kind for feeding them in the bad weather, you'll not be doing that again in a hurry, I take it? LOL

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      • #4
        I left some shot brassicas in the ground to preserve the soil fertility and feed the wildlife (pigeons being a big issue here). But nets on the were left on the overwintered new plantings and action taken against the damn slugs too.

        The great thing about gardening/growing is that nothing is the same except everything! Always a new learning experience.

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        • #5
          One year I nearly lost a number of young fruit trees. There was frost and snow on the ground for quite some time and I noticed the local rabbits were eating the bark off from the trunks. Fortunately I caught it in times and wrapped up the damaged area with taped round bin bags, most of the bark regrew over the summer.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Snoop Puss View Post
            For the first time ever, a lot of my cabbages and caulis have been pecked to shreds. By sparrows of all things!
            The little beggars did the same to my broad beans. I couldn't work out what had been doing it, no sign of slugs nor pigeons, did wonder if it was the strong winds we'd had but one day I got around to the veggie bed a bit quicker than usual and caught half a dozen sparrows at it - the cheeky beggars were using the canes I'd put in (to deter cats from using the bed as a toilet) to hang on and pecking away at the leaves. Only in one bed though - I suspect it was because it's close to a hedge if a rapid evacuation was called for and the other un-netted one is further away from shelter.

            They did have a go at my brassicas last summer - again, I couldn't work out what it was and had put it down to the wind rubbing the leaves against the plastic bird netting, until I spotted them perching on the netting and pecking through the holes.

            Both times caught me out because I know we have quite a population of spadgers but I'd always thought all they ate was seeds - of which they get through loads in the feeders.

            They haven't got my overwintering brassicas though, coz those are under, and staying under, veggiemesh. So will this spring's plantings.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Thelma Sanders View Post
              I should imagine that, to any hungry birds about, your brassicas looked just like an eat- as-much-as-you-can buffet displayed on a white tablecloth

              They probably thought you were kind for feeding them in the bad weather, you'll not be doing that again in a hurry, I take it? LOL
              They were nigh-on the only green thing about for miles after the drought. I was a bit upset at first, but decided to be philosophical about it. The only problem will be if they've got into the habit and do it again next year. Then I will have to take steps.
              Location: north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep. Last frost: usually mid-April, sometimes first week in May. First frost: mid-October.

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              • #8
                Snoop Puss:Then I will have to take steps
                That would sound scary, if you were a bird!

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                • #9
                  Maybe I should just stand outside and shout "I will take steps". Might frighten off the foxes at the very least. Probably give Mr Snoop pause for thought too, for that matter!
                  Location: north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep. Last frost: usually mid-April, sometimes first week in May. First frost: mid-October.

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