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Thread: Exploring my inner Physalis

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    veggiechicken's Avatar
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    Default Exploring my inner Physalis

    I've no idea what the title means either but I thought it would catch your eye
    Let's talk about Physalis - if you don't mind.

    Several different species are edible. These 2 are the most common:-
    Physalis peruviana (Cape gooseberry, Goldenberry or, in James Wong speak - Inca berry). Grown this as a perennial in the GH. Very easy to grow, tolerates abuse, and the fruits are a treat to pick through the winter months.

    Physalis ixocarpa (Tomatillo) is another story. Grew this once many years ago and I'm tempted to try it again this year. Does it need GH protection or can it go outside? Is it as tolerant as the Cape gooseberry?

    I'm thinking of an outdoor Physalis Forest - a permanent area where they can run wild. Is it possible or am I being daft again? Any experiences of growing and eating these Phyngs welcome please.
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    I've been growing both for 4 years, initially indoors then outside. Tomatilloes are so successful that they've self-seeded. Other than needing 2 to fruit and remembering to stake them, they are no bother.

    Physalis come as both Peruviana and pruinosa - the latter is a dwarf version with sweeter berries. Both fruit reliably outdoors where I am, but pruinosa is much much earlier.

    Can't see that it would be a problem where you are. ��
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    Thanks sparrow I haven't heard of pruinosa before.
    Do they cross with each other - or wouldn't it matter if they were all together (assuming they are left to self seed)?
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    happyhumph is offline Cropper
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    Sparrow obviously knows far more than I do! I'm trying tomatillo for the first time this year - two in gh and two outside to see which does best. Hoping I'll be overrun by them.....
    Another happy Nutter...

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    I wouldn't have thought the physalis varieties would cross as they are different plant families, but I'll see if I can find out. The physalis and tomatillos won't cross if my undestanding's right.
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    Physalis peruviana - I've got a couple of perennial in the unheated GH - probably got the seed from sparrow 2 or 3 years ago. I've tried to leave them outside overwinter but they did struggle - might give them one more try with maybe a cloch for the worst of the winter.

    Looks like I should give tomatillos a go... do believe I ignored my pruinosa so well it popped its boots

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    I tried capes last year and trying tomatillos this year. I found my lastyear capers roots are not rotted in the ground. tried to pull them out, but it wasn't easy. does it mean they come back this year???

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elfeda View Post
    I tried capes last year and trying tomatillos this year. I found my lastyear capers roots are not rotted in the ground. tried to pull them out, but it wasn't easy. does it mean they come back this year???
    They might do - like I say I've got a couple growing as perennials inan unheated GH - I cut them back to about a foot so there was still some foliage on them over winter. The ones that I have left outside did die off for the most part - though I think last year one struggled through winter but didn't really get going in the Spring.

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