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Thread: Broody hens - advice please

  1. #1
    Gorsty is offline Sprouter
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    Default Broody hens - advice please

    Hi there

    I have a light sussex who has bn broody for more than a week now and hv bn trying to break her broodyness by turfing her off the nest and locking her out of the nesting area.
    I have a Omlet house and have even taken the droppings tray from underneath the perches so that when she roosts with the rest of the girls, there is plenty of air flow underneath her.

    Couple of days ago, another hen, this time a Black Rock has joined her - is it possible hens can pass on broodyness?

    I was getting 4 eggs/day from 4 hens and am now down to 2 eggs/day.

    There is no chance of the eggs hatching as we dont have a cockerel.

    Any advice folks?

    Many thanks

    Jan

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    My three are broody too, and losing feathers at the same time, so no eggs at all for me for a while now. I normally just let it run its course. I'm sure others can give much better advice lol

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    Gorsty is offline Sprouter
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    Well I cant moan really as the four of them have supplied me with eggs all through the winter - no one moulted which is a bit strange as two of them were from 2016. Think I've only had one broody since I started keeping hens back in 2009 so havent done bad really.

    Will see what the others have to
    say.
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    They are far more broody in their first summer after a winter it diminishes next year and probably won't even happen. You can try all sorts of things dunking them in a bucket of water to cool their bits turfing them off the nest, keeping them shut out but, I would leave them to it and create an additional nesting area for your non broodies nearby. Difficult in an Omlet I know.

    If you persist in stopping them you will make them less inclined to trust you and more reluctant to be picked up later on.

    Nature wants what nature needs, allow them to sit, maybe get some fertile eggs for them to sit on if you want to increase your group, and allow those that still want to lay somewhere near so that they can do.
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    I let them do whatever they need to do. They have a rest while they're broody and they deserve that after laying for months. Think of it as a holiday, and they'll come back into lay all the better for it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorsty View Post
    Hi there

    I have a light sussex who has bn broody for more than a week now and hv bn trying to break her broodyness by turfing her off the nest and locking her out of the nesting area.
    Yes, prevents them sitting on Eggs.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gorsty View Post
    Hi there

    I have a Omlet house and have even taken the droppings tray from underneath the perches so that when she roosts with the rest of the girls, there is plenty of air flow underneath her.
    Not going to do much to help. Even creating more work for you.... put it back.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gorsty View Post

    Couple of days ago, another hen, this time a Black Rock has joined her - is it possible hens can pass on broodyness?
    Is that time of the year, so more likely to be a coincidence

    ensure they get plenty of food and water. You could put them in sin bins, but not going to reduce time out by much. best thing is keep them out of the nesting area...
    Last edited by 4Shoes; 09-06-2018 at 09:12 PM.

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    I think they pass it on, if after a few weeks they haven’t given up they can become sitting ducks for red mite and their health can deteriorate as ideally they would hatch some eggs and get on with it.

    If it persists, put them in a metal cage, raised up on house blocks with a perch jammed across. Keep them in there. They can’t get cosy with constant air flow underneath them.
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    Scarlet

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