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Thread: Hello there! some random newbie questions about compost and raspberries

  1. #1
    FlisH is offline Germinator
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    Default Hello there! some random newbie questions about compost and raspberries

    Hi everyone, I've just taken on an allotment plot nearly 3 weeks ago, and I'm loving it!

    Hello there! some random newbie questions about compost and raspberries-before-after-plot.jpg

    I've started planting, even though I know it's a bit late in the season to get much out. However I just wanted to ask, having cleared an overgrown plot, I've got more of a compost mountain than a heap. It does contain all sorts of weeds, including a lot of horsetail and bindweed. I've heard that I don't want to spread the resulting compost on the plot or I'll be spreading the weeds again, but what on earth can I do? Is it just a case of bagging and taking to the tip?

    Next I've been lucky enough to inherit raspberries, but they are currently growing in a tangled mess of older and newer looking branches, some are fruiting. I'm not sure how to best care for them? Should I just wait until end of season and prune well back? Would it be possible to space them out by digging some out at that point of would I damage the roots? They are about 5ft high in places so must have well established roots?

    Anyway thanks for reading and any advice or suggestions appreciated!
    Last edited by FlisH; 14-07-2017 at 09:25 AM.

  2. #2
    burnie is offline Veggie gardener
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    Hi Flish, firstly I would burn all the mountain and spread the ash round the raspberries as they like it(especially wood ash). You need to know what the rasps are, if they are summer fruiting, you remove the old wood and tie in the new growth to wires/posts for next year. If they are Autumn fruiting, then after fruiting you cut the lot off as they fruit on new wood.

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    Jay-ell is online now Welcome To The Jungle
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    Hi Flish and welcome to the five.

    Same advice as burnie really.
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    No advice needed you've had it, but welcome to the vine
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    Flish you've had some excellent advice already so all I'll say is hello and welcome to the vine
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    I have inherited a similar raspberry tangle - I've tied all the new canes to posts (which has smartened it up no end actually!) and then will cut all the old stuff down once its died back at the end of the year. By now you should be able to tell the new ones quite easily, as they won't be showing signs of fruiting
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  7. #7
    nickdub is offline Seedling
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlisH View Post
    Hi everyone, I've just taken on an allotment plot nearly 3 weeks ago, and I'm loving it!

    Attachment 74919

    I've started planting, even though I know it's a bit late in the season to get much out. However I just wanted to ask, having cleared an overgrown plot, I've got more of a compost mountain than a heap. It does contain all sorts of weeds, including a lot of horsetail and bindweed. I've heard that I don't want to spread the resulting compost on the plot or I'll be spreading the weeds again, but what on earth can I do? Is it just a case of bagging and taking to the tip?

    Next I've been lucky enough to inherit raspberries, but they are currently growing in a tangled mess of older and newer looking branches, some are fruiting. I'm not sure how to best care for them? Should I just wait until end of season and prune well back? Would it be possible to space them out by digging some out at that point of would I damage the roots? They are about 5ft high in places so must have well established roots?

    Anyway thanks for reading and any advice or suggestions appreciated!

    As an alternative to the burning suggestions which will definitely work, you could get some of those one ton builders bags which they deliver sand in and bag your green stuff up to rot down (do not mix it with other compost). The advantage will be that you will have more useful material to use when its rotted down next year - the downside is you'll have to sieve it or check through it minutely to screen our any weed roots that do survive.

    Probably depends on time available, and what other sources of enrichment for your soil like horse manure you have access to.

    I use this bagging up trick with leaves in the Autumn - takes about 2 years to get leaf-mold this way, but its free and you can drag the full bags around if they happen to get in the way.

    You can move your raspberries in the winter most easily -leave them alone for now. It may be better to start with new canes unless the old ones look real healthy, as they some times build up diseases if they've been in the same place for a long time.
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  8. #8
    burnie is offline Veggie gardener
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    As an aside, I had some Autumn Bliss and I cut half the stems to the ground and only cut half off the rest, I then got 2 crops one almost as early as the summer and then a full crop later, thing was we didn't really like the taste, so pulled them out and gave them away.

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