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Thread: Winter Squashes

  1. #1
    veg4681's Avatar
    veg4681 is offline Cropper
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    Default Winter Squashes

    Thinking ahead for next year, thought I get the ball rolling on the variety of squashes. I was at Sainsbury recently and noticed a good mix of winter squash; Crown Prince, Harlequin, Acorn Green, Red Kuri etc and although they were dear at 1.99 each (some of them only marginally bigger than a tennis ball) I had wondered if it was still worth buying for the seeds as you get the chance to try out the fruit too (helping to decide if that's for you). I gather that I can always check on seed websites if any of them are
    F1 hybrid. However Crown Prince is F1 in one website and not F1 in another
    Basically I'd be interested to know

    squash variety you've grown (including from seeds of bought veg)
    squash variety you've eaten (what's it like) but not grown yet
    their storage quality if possible

    Thanks.
    Last edited by veg4681; 25-11-2007 at 12:16 PM.
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    Default

    My favourite is Butternut. Daughter grew loads last year, but mine didn't do well this year - 1 fruit only. Mind you the courgettes were c**p too, and I'm usually giving them away. Basically, try the supermarket ones and if you like them have a go at growing them yourself. Good luck.

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    Hello Veg4681,

    The only squash I've grown is Red Kuri (thanks Momol for the identification) and I "inherited" them from the previous owner - they just started to grow and in my ignorance (thought they were potatoes ) I tended them and ended up with loads. They kept all year in my dry, light and frost free workshop and I used the last of the 2006 batch in September 2007!

    If you look at my avatar you'll see a couple of the surprise ones from last year. I kept some seeds and grew them deliberately this year. I have also kept some seeds from this year's batch - keep your eye on the seed swap

    They are quite small, the largest being the size of a childs football but they taste fantastic (imho). I have eaten them raw and cooked. They are very tasty and a bit "nutty", the fruit is quite dense and, I am told makes a good substitutute for butternut squash.

    I can tell you too, they do make a cracking pumpkin and sweetcorn soup .
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    Yes Rustylady, I gather that Butternut is the most popular among all other squash and it's the only one I've ever eaten and really like. But I do wonder if I'm missing out on other interesting shape & size of squashes (apart from going crazy over variety chasing ). I fancy the look of butternut called Barbara F1 that's mostly fleshy bits than seeds.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarey55 View Post
    I can tell you too, they do make a cracking pumpkin and sweetcorn soup .
    Not personally, you understand. I make the soup, the pumpkin just goes in it.

    Thought I'd get that in before some other smart Alec Grape does
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarey55 View Post
    The only squash I've grown is Red Kuri (thanks Momol for the identification) and I "inherited" them from the previous owner - they just started to grow and in my ignorance (thought they were potatoes )
    Easy done!

    Quote Originally Posted by scarey55 View Post
    If you look at my avatar you'll see a couple of the surprise ones from last year. I kept some seeds and grew them deliberately this year. I have also kept some seeds from this year's batch - keep your eye on the seed swap

    They are quite small, the largest being the size of a childs football but they taste fantastic (imho). I have eaten them raw and cooked. They are very tasty and a bit "nutty", the fruit is quite dense and, I am told makes a good substitutute for butternut squash.
    Oh oh! pleeeeeeeeease!!

  7. #7
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    I want to confirm what Scarey 55 said, Red Kuri is tasty and easy growing,it is a recommended winter squash ( me think). Mine produce 13 squashes from 3 vines ( lost 4 due to the slugs !)...go for it Hazel & Veg 4681 .
    I grew my Red Kuri for the 2nd year now, the taste is not easily beaten. The Yokohama, taste not bad, the texture is far smoother but since it need such long growing time and space, I will not nominate him.

    My Pomme D'or is very cute, the biggest are the size of grape fruit and some smaller ones, harvested over 40 of them in total. Taste wise is not really that special but Ok. It is just so cute and easy to grow.

    Happy squashing,

    Momol
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  8. #8
    Peter's Avatar
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    Do try Crown prince, only note of caution is size, in a normal year, they are pretty big, have a look at my 2006 squash harvest on my blog.

    Superb flavour, cut a plug round the stalk, prise it out, scoop out the seeds and string, put the plug back in minus stalk, place plug side down on roasting tray and roast till a carving fork goes in easily.
    The inside steams, the upside down is to stop warm water preventing the base from cooking, allows water to get out.
    Use what you can with your roast meat & other veg.
    scoop out the rest of the cooked flesh, pop it in the fridge and use on a subsequent day as a soup ingredient.
    Always thank people who have helped you immediately, as they may not be around to thank later.
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