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  1. #1
    Edith is offline Seedling
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    Default What likes stony soil?

    I am trying to extend my usable allotment this year. Basically its around 2/3 cultivated, with the remainder being harder work. A LOT of rubble was dumped on it by the previous occupier, who planned to build a shed then didn't. Most of this (solidifed cement bags, huge rusty sheets of corrugated iron) I have heaved behind the shed. But some of the beds were used for some sort of ornamental garden and are full of pebbles, stones etc. As in, down to two spades depth (I don't get why it is that deep, but I am rubbish at growing flowers.

    So I have sieved, and sieved and it is less stony. But it still isn't going to be any good for carrots! fwiw I'd descrbe it as stony soil, as in, now its much more soil than stones, but there are some stones.

    So what could I grow? Is there anything that really likes this sort of soil? Anything that doesn't mind it? Was wondering about sweetcorn? Soil hasn't been manured recently.

    Or do I have to keep on going with the sieving?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Edith; 05-03-2009 at 05:03 PM.

  2. #2
    lynda66's Avatar
    lynda66 is offline Gardening Guru
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    Default

    most things that don't have deep roots should be fine, ie not carrots or parsnips, most roots will work their way round the stones .... keep adding compost or manure etc, and eventually it will get better..... my soil is quite bad too, but i've only removed the boulders big lumps and the bricks, and anything bigger than an inch or 2, as i come across them .... i'd be there all year if i had to remove them all

  3. #3
    Edith is offline Seedling
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    Default

    sounds good.

    Might plan on beans/peas then, the soil seems really quite bad so it could do with a boost!

  4. #4
    Snadger's Avatar
    Snadger is offline Gardening Guru
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    Usually builders rubble is very alkaline so as long as you stay clear of tatties you should be able to grow almost anything!

    Just remember when others are suffering from drought............under each stone there's usually moisture!
    Last edited by Snadger; 05-03-2009 at 05:41 PM.
    My Majesty made for him a garden anew in order
    to present to him vegetables and all beautiful flowers.- Offerings of Thutmose III to Amon-Ra (1500 BCE)
    Diversify & prosper!


  5. #5
    Eco-Chic's Avatar
    Eco-Chic is offline Cropper
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    Figs like rubbish soil and need their roots confined to fruit well.
    If a thing's worth doing, it's worth doing to excess

  6. #6
    SarzWix is offline Gardening Gnomette
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    A lot of herbs like stony/poor soil too, so if you were planning a permanent herb bed, that might be a good place for it!

  7. #7
    Alice's Avatar
    Alice is offline Mature Fruiter
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    A long time ago I had a garden which was very stony. I could rake up stones forever but they just reappeared. It didn't seem to matter as everything grew well apart from carrots and parsnips.

    From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs.

  8. #8
    zazen999 is offline Funky Cold Ribena
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    Can I get all technical and mention 'frost heave'...the stones - no matter how many you take out - will continue to break up below ground and work their way surfacewards.

    So - you could get yourself a couple of deep beds for carrots and parsnips and just keep adding your own home made compost to the soil to improve it.


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