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  1. #1
    cbearder is offline Germinator
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    Default Custard Apple seeds

    I finally plucked up the courage to try one, and they are really worth it, delicious. But they have large hard seeds inside. Any chance I can grow these? do they need soaking, heating, or passing through the gut of an exotic animal before they will germinate?
    C

  2. #2
    Alison's Avatar
    Alison is online now Gardening Guru
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    Don't know, we tried to grow one after eating them on holiday in Madiera (surprisingly nice aren't they) but didn't manage to achieve anything. Am a bit dubious that they'd grow here but suppose they'd make a nice conservatory plant perhaps?

    FYI, we tried soaking the seeds before planting up to soften them, didn't seem to help and they rotted down eventually. Worth a try though as you've nothing to loose.

    Some of us live in the past, always talking about back then. Some of us live in the future, always planning what we are going to do. And, then there are those, who neither look behind or ahead, but just enjoy the moment of right now.

    Which one are you and is it how you want to be?

  3. #3
    PAULW is offline Cropper
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    CB
    You will be very lucky to raise a custard apple from seed most apples are raised from cutting and will not come true from seed.

  4. #4
    Alison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAULW View Post
    CB
    You will be very lucky to raise a custard apple from seed most apples are raised from cutting and will not come true from seed.
    I don't think they're part of the same family as normal apples, they're a native of the West Indies and according to t'internet, seed is the normal method of propagation but can't find anything about how you'd do it. Does say though that it is too tender for California and trees introduced into Palestine succumbed to the cold so if you do manage one, it's definitely not one for outdoors overwinter!

    Some of us live in the past, always talking about back then. Some of us live in the future, always planning what we are going to do. And, then there are those, who neither look behind or ahead, but just enjoy the moment of right now.

    Which one are you and is it how you want to be?

  5. #5
    PAULW is offline Cropper
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    CUSTARD APPLE
    Propagation: Since there are no recognized rootstocks for cherimoyas, seedlings are universally utilized. Seeds from the White cultivar (Dr. White) are thought by some to produce superior rootstocks, however there does not appear to be a great deal of objective data to support this position. Seeds remain viable for two to three years if kept dry and protected from weevil and fungi. With 70 F bottom heat, seed will germinate in about 21 days, but will require about 40 days under normal ambient growing conditions. Seedlings should be transplanted to deep containers (approximately 18") when they are 3" tall to promote development of the tap root. In frost-free areas, it is recommended that seedlings for spring grafting be planted in their ultimate location in the fall and grafted in the ground the following spring.

    http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/cherimoya.html

  6. #6
    Crazy Chickie's Avatar
    Crazy Chickie is offline Sprouter
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    I got some of these to germinate when I lived in Edinburgh, grew to be a decent looking plants within the first year but gave them all away when I moved up here. They were quite easy to germinate, think I gave them bottom heat, kept them in porch and on window sills, the porch was heated through the winter. Don't know if they would ever have come to anything, grew them mainly out of curiosity much like you do with avacado stones.

  7. #7
    cbearder is offline Germinator
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    Thanks, it looks like its worth a go for an interesting foliage plant in my unheated (except in dire weather) conservatory. I will give them a soak for a few hours and plant them in the kitchen now and put them out in C in the spring. Watch this space!

  8. #8
    Maz
    Maz is offline Germinator
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    Hi Guy's..The way I did it was pot them in compost,water them then tied the whole thing up with clear plastic bag,then I put them in a dark cupboard..kept checking now and again..and they grew..I now have five healthy plants/trees..not quite sure what to call them

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