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  1. #1
    Snadger's Avatar
    Snadger is offline Gardening Guru
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    Default Can you eat beetroot tops?

    Wasn't sure which section to post this in but no doubt LJ will be poised with her button if it needs changing!
    The beetroot I have stored in boxes of old compost in the shed are starting to sprout! I was wondering if the leaves would be a good source of winter salad material? They would certainly add a bit of colour to the plate, but I've never eaten them and wondered if it was a good idea?
    My Majesty made for him a garden anew in order
    to present to him vegetables and all beautiful flowers.- Offerings of Thutmose III to Amon-Ra (1500 BCE)
    Diversify & prosper!


  2. #2
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    Alice is offline Mature Fruiter
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    Yes Snadger, you can eat the beetroot tops. The young leaves are nice. They sell them in the bags of mixed salad leaves in the supermarkets.

  3. #3
    Snadger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alice View Post
    Yes Snadger, you can eat the beetroot tops. The young leaves are nice. They sell them in the bags of mixed salad leaves in the supermarkets.
    Excellent, that's my winter salad sorted then Alice! What you could call a 'Dual use' veggie then?
    My Majesty made for him a garden anew in order
    to present to him vegetables and all beautiful flowers.- Offerings of Thutmose III to Amon-Ra (1500 BCE)
    Diversify & prosper!


  4. #4
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    Did you not read the thread about a certain celebrity chef Snadger?
    Bright Blessings
    Earthbabe

    If at first you don't succeed, open a bottle of wine.

  5. #5
    Snadger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Earthbabe View Post
    Did you not read the thread about a certain celebrity chef Snadger?
    Kieth Floyd (slurp), Rick Stein and HFW are the only celebrity chefs I have ever seen! Don't watch telly much!
    My Majesty made for him a garden anew in order
    to present to him vegetables and all beautiful flowers.- Offerings of Thutmose III to Amon-Ra (1500 BCE)
    Diversify & prosper!


  6. #6
    Earthbabe's Avatar
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    Me neither. We are currently on the fiftieth (give or take) viewing of The Snowman having bought it for £6 at Sainsbury's (other supermarkets are available) on Friday!!! Well it saves me from repeats of Barbie as Rapunzel!!!
    Bright Blessings
    Earthbabe

    If at first you don't succeed, open a bottle of wine.

  7. #7
    valmarg is offline Cropper
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    You can certainly eat beetroot tops. If you look in the seed catalogues for next year (or even last year), in the 'sprouting veg' section, you will find beetroot.

    I shall now give you the benefit of my experience!!

    When I have grown alfalfa, mung beans, etc, I have washed the seedlings to get rid of the seed husks. I think in the case of beetroot you should treat the seedlings like cress, and when the plantlets have got to a certain height, you should cut them off with a pair of scissors.

    I tried to treat them like the said alfalfa, etc and it was like chewing grit. The seed husks were so hard, and didn't come away from the seedlings. Looking down the retrospectogram (aka with the benefit of hindsight) I would treat it like cress.

    At this time of year sprouted seedlings do add to the 'home grown' store. I once read that the bags of salad leaves in supermarkets have been washed in a chlorine solution 20 times stronger than the water in your local swimming pool.

    Never bought another bag since.

    I think alfalfa cress is so much more tasty at this time of year than the boring lettuces available.

    Tomatoes are another thing!! Spanish/Canary Island are crap. So until the Channel Islands are supplying decent tomatoes - they are 'off the menu'.

  8. #8
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    Small leaves in salads. Larger use like spinach or chard. great in a quiche or veggie bake. They also make a fabulous earthy soup with a bit of onion, potato and stock pureed.

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