Grow Your Own Magazine

View our latest subscriptions offers here!


+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 10
  1. #1
    Cyberus is offline Germinator
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    4

    Default Cut back my rasp canes, or is it too late?

    I took over an allotment late summer last year (July). I had my raspberries crop through into October, but it was still quite warm there here in Kent - so I have no idea if they are Summer or Autumn fruiting variety (could they be a mixture perhaps?)

    I haven't cut them back yet, but one of the guys at the allotment (who used to be a farmer) said that they should have been cut back before winter.
    I understand that if they are indeed Autumn fruiting variety, I could get away with cutting them back now.....

    The canes are just over three foot high, and bare as far as I can remember from my last visit at the weekend. So I guess I just leave them, rather than risk cutting them all the way down?

    The effect of not cutting them back will be weaker stems, or a bad crop???

    Any suggestions gratefully received.

  2. #2
    PAULW is offline Cropper
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Poole Dorset
    Posts
    1,517

    Default

    CY
    Autumn fruiting raspberries fruit on the new cane grown in the summer whereas the summer fruiting type fruit on last years cane so if they are the autumn type it is of no use to leave last years canes standing, you will see the new shoots appearing at the base of the old canes.

  3. #3
    Cyberus is offline Germinator
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PAULW View Post
    CY
    Autumn fruiting raspberries fruit on the new cane grown in the summer whereas the summer fruiting type fruit on last years cane so if they are the autumn type it is of no use to leave last years canes standing, you will see the new shoots appearing at the base of the old canes.
    Thanks for your reply. Just so I understand:
    So if they are summer fruiting ones, new shoots should be visible. If they are autumn fruiting ones, they will have no new growth yet?

    I read that I need to cut them down to 6in from the ground.


    That seems very drastic!
    Last edited by Lesley Jay; 06-03-2007 at 06:32 PM.

  4. #4
    PAULW is offline Cropper
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Poole Dorset
    Posts
    1,517

    Default

    I am down in Dorset and my autumn rasps have new shoots just appearing I had cut the old canes back to the ground, the new shoots that are growing now will produce fruit in the summer/autumn.
    With summer types the fruit is produced on old wood so the new shoots that grew last year are the canes that will produce the fruit this year, the canes that produced the fruit last year are the canes you cut out
    hope this helps

  5. #5
    smallblueplanet's Avatar
    smallblueplanet is offline Mature Fruiter
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Vale of Pewsey
    Posts
    7,139

    Default

    I understood that if you left some canes of autumn fruiting rasps rather than cutting them all down you got an earlier crop of those stems?
    Manda.

    To see a world in a grain of sand
    And a heaven in a wild flower

  6. #6
    Cyberus is offline Germinator
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    4

    Default Thanks

    Thanks for your replies. I guess I will have another look when I next go up there. I am still not sure if I am meant to be cutting them back or not!

  7. #7
    GeordieVik's Avatar
    GeordieVik is offline Sprouter
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Newcastle upon Tyne
    Posts
    109

    Default reminder please?

    Hi all,

    my raspberry canes (newly planted in late October, instructions said to cut down to 18", but they were that long anyway, so I left them) are now starting to show leaves - I'm sure I read somewhere on the Vine when this happens, to cut the old cane down to X inches (1", 2", ground level?) so that the plant puts its energy into growing new canes instead of the old one.

    I have had a good search, and can't find the thread where it was mentioned

    Please help!

    Thanks

    Vik
    Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes

    http://viks-garden.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
    Alison's Avatar
    Alison is offline Gardening Guru
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Warrington, Cheshire
    Posts
    11,002

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by smallblueplanet View Post
    I understood that if you left some canes of autumn fruiting rasps rather than cutting them all down you got an earlier crop of those stems?
    You do, I found this out by accident when I had a bit of a busy year and didn't get around to cutting the previous year's growth back. You're still as well to cut at least half of the canes back though otherwise it all gets conjested and I guess wears the plant out so you would only get two low crops. The previous year's canes will then crop in about June (geography / climate change dependant) and the new growth in the autumn as usual.

    Some of us live in the past, always talking about back then. Some of us live in the future, always planning what we are going to do. And, then there are those, who neither look behind or ahead, but just enjoy the moment of right now.

    Which one are you and is it how you want to be?

Similar Threads

  1. Do I cut back new Autumn Bliss raspberry canes?
    By Nibbler in forum Feeling Fruity
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 28-02-2011, 01:39 PM
  2. How many rasp canes to a half barrell?
    By Scottishnewbie in forum Feeling Fruity
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-04-2010, 10:32 AM
  3. How to I.D. rasp canes - autumn or winter?
    By gorgeousgrower in forum Feeling Fruity
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 19-02-2010, 09:26 AM
  4. rasp pruning
    By murray in forum Feeling Fruity
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 27-12-2007, 08:55 AM
  5. rasp canes
    By murray in forum Feeling Fruity
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 27-10-2007, 05:26 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Organic catalogue