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Thread: Cover for a hot bed

  1. #9
    Jungle Jane's Avatar
    Jungle Jane is online now Early Fruiter
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    For seed germination polythene would be best for warmth & keeping the temp & moisture nice. If the condensation gets too much you could adjust things or change to fleece later,sounds good for an early start
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  2. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rary View Post
    I have possibly named it wrong, I will be filling a box with a sand compost mix and burying an electric heating cable in it, it will be large enough for seed propagation and also to grow on some plants

    Otherwise known as a heated propagation bench!

    An hot bed is an entirely different concept, but know where your coming from

    Gis a mo!

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wwkGXEatKSk

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Rf36owOCjPw

    These are worth a neb at!
    veggiechicken, Snadger and rary like this.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit, wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad"

  3. #11
    Chestnut is online now Tuber
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    I have never built a hotbed, but intend to try this year, so I am interested in everyone’s thoughts. Instinctively I would go with fleece inside the GH, but I don’t know if that’s right.
    Might just be a memory of a book I read about growing winter veg (I think CDowding) which describes a system of fleece over plants inside polytunnels....
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  4. #12
    Aberdeenplotter is offline Gardening Guru
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    My heated bench sits on top of my workbench in the garage. It is three full sized seed trays long and three full sized trays wide. i.e. it can hold 9 full sized seed trays. The bottom and sides are made of " ply the sides being 6" deep.The bottom is lined with thick clear polythene (colour not material). I then have an inch or so of damp sharp sand on which my heating cable is placed. Then another inch or so of sand and then another layer of polythene (to stop the sand drying out). I have the heating cable attached to a rod thermostat and set to 18c. Finally I have the whole surface covered with capillary matting which is kept moist. I find this helps keep the temperature uniform across the bench.
    Last edited by Aberdeenplotter; 08-01-2019 at 08:46 PM.

  5. #13
    Aberdeenplotter is offline Gardening Guru
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    OOps forgot to say. I have an 8 tube t5 growlight over.

  6. #14
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    That sounds a great setup AP... I wish I had room for that somewhere.

  7. #15
    rary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aberdeenplotter View Post
    My heated bench sits on top of my workbench in the garage. It is three full sized seed trays long and three full sized trays wide. i.e. it can hold 9 full sized seed trays. The bottom and sides are made of " ply the sides being 6" deep.The bottom is lined with thick clear polythene (colour not material). I then have an inch or so of damp sharp sand on which my heating cable is placed. Then another inch or so of sand and then another layer of polythene (to stop the sand drying out). I have the heating cable attached to a rod thermostat and set to 18c. Finally I have the whole surface covered with capillary matting which is kept moist. I find this helps keep the temperature uniform across the bench.
    My bench would hold 20 trays but don't envisage having that many at the one time, so will be using part of it to grow on some pot plants, I have never thought of the second poly layer but like the idea as it would help maintain the temperature, and hold the moisture around 5he cable (I have had a bench dry out and go on fire, it was peat that I had been using rather than sand) do you have the capillary matting drawing from a reservoir or do you wet it down with a watering can
    Aberdeenplotter likes this.
    it may be a struggle to reach the top, but once your over the hill your problems start.

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  8. #16
    Aberdeenplotter is offline Gardening Guru
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    Quote Originally Posted by rary View Post
    My bench would hold 20 trays but don't envisage having that many at the one time, so will be using part of it to grow on some pot plants, I have never thought of the second poly layer but like the idea as it would help maintain the temperature, and hold the moisture around 5he cable (I have had a bench dry out and go on fire, it was peat that I had been using rather than sand) do you have the capillary matting drawing from a reservoir or do you wet it down with a watering can
    I just water it ever so often. I can see how peat wouldn't be a great idea

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