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Thread: Grow your own Mulch

  1. #9
    Thelma Sanders is online now Gardening Guru
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    Quote Originally Posted by veggiechicken View Post
    Of course, grass counts.
    I'm wondering about growing clover paths - flowers for bees, nitrogen fixer in the soil and the chickens might like it - and it looks prettier than grass.
    There's a lot of clover already in my paths - probably more clover than grass, by accident rather than design though It seems to take a bit longer to recover from a short mowing than grass, I find., though
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    My grandfather always grew nasrurtiums in with his potatoes.

    And when your back stops aching,
    And your hands begin to harden.
    You will find yourself a partner,
    In the glory of the garden.

    Rudyard Kipling.

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    I'm in a fortunate position of having quite a large area of land that I'm hoping will prove a mulch source for my veg patch. And I'm glad to deplete it of nutrients because I want it to revert to being a wild flower meadow. Ploughed it up on the recommendation of the forestry agent to reduce the fire risk, but that brought up nutrients and so now just awful wild grass. Didn't do much in the drought this year, but am hoping to get scything the grass next year and hoping that that will eventually provide the conditions for wild flowers.

    Meanwhile, how about lettuce? I've got about a billion lettuce seeds (you get so many in a packet and I have rather a lot of packets...). I'm guessing that they would do too.
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  4. #12
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    veggiechicken is online now Warning!! Contains Nuts
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    Quote Originally Posted by Penellype View Post
    No reason why you can't mulch with things that you have grown in your plot/garden. However, whatever you grow, you are not going to have enough of it unless you deplete the nutrients from one part of the garden to feed another, or add nutrients from outside. The simple reason for this is that you can't create nutrients out of nothing. Assuming that some of the vegetable matter is not being returned to the soil (ie you are eating it), you will need to replace it from elsewhere.
    I don't think "Mulch" has to be nutritious - its something to suppress weeds, retain moisture in the soil and ultimately to decompose. Cardboard isn't "nutritious" but people use it as "mulch".
    When you have areas that aren't used for growing food, as I do, I'd like to use it to produce other useful stuff, like "mulch".
    Large leaved, quick growing, slow to seed, no hassle plants would be ideal. If they are a by-product of something edible, even better.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Shoes View Post
    Clover smells so good. Go for a dwarfing variety. On impulse I bought a packet of red clover - must be 10 years ago now. Turned out to be a green manure and not suitable to grow in lawns and paths.
    'Suckling clover' is often found in lawns that are close mown. It has little yellow flowers.
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    My Majesty made for him a garden anew in order
    to present to him vegetables and all beautiful flowers.- Offerings of Thutmose III to Amon-Ra (1500 BCE)

    Diversify & prosper



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    Grow a large bed of red veined sorrel, that stuff is perennial, indestructible, large-leaved, prolific and looks fantastic. You could even put a few of the young leaves in salad, if you don't mind ruining a perfectly good salad.
    He-Pep!

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    The main difference between green manures and mulches is that green manures are usually dug in in-situ whereas mulches can be utilised any where.

    Broad beans though can be grown through the winter and either grown to fruition of have there tops lopped of and used as a mulch anywhere and there roots dug in in-situ to give a bit of organic matter and allow the nitrogen fixating nodules to release there nitro.
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    My Majesty made for him a garden anew in order
    to present to him vegetables and all beautiful flowers.- Offerings of Thutmose III to Amon-Ra (1500 BCE)

    Diversify & prosper



  8. #16
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    Horseradish produces a lot of foliage and is hard to kill!
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    My Majesty made for him a garden anew in order
    to present to him vegetables and all beautiful flowers.- Offerings of Thutmose III to Amon-Ra (1500 BCE)

    Diversify & prosper



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