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Thread: Vine Leaves

  1. #1
    greenishfing's Avatar
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    Default Vine Leaves

    I was reading another post where Jay-ell mentioned Dolmas. I also like Greek food but have never used vine leaves. Does anyone know if the leaves of any vine can be used. Can they be used fresh. Can they be preserved for Winter? I prune thousands off my greenhouse vines every Summer and it would be nice to find a use for them.

  2. #2
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    I've used young leaves from my grapevines - picked fresh. for dolmades.

    Also used to make Folly wine from the leaves and prunings.
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    Folly wine???? I must find out more.

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    When you do a sumer prune of the vines the trimmings can be used to make a wine, similar to other vegetable based wines.

    I was spoilt - when I worked at one place in London there was a woman who came in and used the kitchen to make (and sell) lunches to the offices there and often made fresh Dolmas. Far better that the tins of stuffed vine leaves you buy in supermarkets.

    I'd say use the younger leaves. The older leaves contain a fair bit of tannin and can be scrunched up and added to your jars of pickled onions or gherkins. The leaf itself physically acts to keep them submerged and the tannin helps keep them crisp.
    Last edited by Jay-ell; 05-05-2019 at 11:13 AM.
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    Last edited by Jay-ell; 05-05-2019 at 11:05 AM.
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    New all singing all dancing blog - Jasons Jungle

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    I have an ornamental vine with enormous leaves, must give it a try. Am waiting for my new Lakemont to grow.

    You can use blanched cabbage leaves.
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