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Thread: Christmas Pudding Fail

  1. #1
    Shadylane's Avatar
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    Default Christmas Pudding Fail

    So I decided to make a Christmas pudding this year using Nigella's recipe, multiplied by 1.5 and split into three 1 litre bowls. They took AGES - well over the recommended 6 hours and one of them still has a bit on the base which looks soggy. I tasted a bit from the first one as there was some stuck to the bowl - I wasn't impressed - but maybe it will improve with age.

    The worst thing though is these visible lumps of fat(suet) around the outside but mainly on the top. I was intending on giving one to the parents and one to the in-laws as part of their chrimbo hampers, but as they look well mingin' I'm now not so sure. Does anyone know if this is normal/acceptable and if not, how I can rectify this in the future - assuming I ever bother with this incredible faff ever again.

    Cheers in advance

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    If you think they are undercooked, you could microwave them for just a few minutes. Don't forget, though, that they will be cooked again before serving hot.

    I don't know about lumps of fat - but surely that would melt out when you cook it or pour over flaming brandy? Possibly one pudding got the majority of the suet?

    I made Clootie Dumpling for my Dad last year (year before?) and, if I recall, that looked pretty gopping until cooked - my Dad fries it!
    Last edited by julesapple; 17-12-2013 at 05:03 PM.
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    Suet usually melts during cooking, so I can't understand why you can see lumps of it in/on your puddings. How did you cook them?

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    Default

    Cheers for the responses. I steamed em. In a steamer. I know it will melt again when cooked, but it just looks a bit rank now...which doesn't look good presentation wise.

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    Wrap them in a cloth!!
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    Without seeing the puds, I'm only guessing - I would say these aren't lumps of uncooked suet, but wee pockets of suet that have formed in the natural pocks of the pudding and they've probably become visible as the puds cooled. I think it's probably completely normal.

    I know it looks yucky presentation wise - could you perhaps wrap them in butter muslin to gift them?
    Jules

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    Thanks popples

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    In the days when I made them I boiled them for 8hours and made them in about August. They were boiled for 2 hours again before serving. The best ones were the ones I kept for the following year. BTW I used my Grandmothers receipe that she used during the war and it has grated carrot in it!!!!!
    Gardening requires a lot of water - most of it in the form of perspiration. Lou Erickson, critic and poet

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