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  1. #1
    Glutton4...'s Avatar
    Glutton4... is offline Gardening Guru
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    Default Should I keep a second Cockerel?

    Before you start I have no problem with eating them! Those that have been eaten were deeeelish! I was just wondering, before the remaining two meet their maker, would I be better off keeping two Roos in the flock instead of one?

    They would all run together, with all the Hens, unless I decide to guarantee fertility for hatching some more Chicks, and pen one of them separately with a handful of Hens.

    Comments gratefully received!
    Last edited by Glutton4...; 03-03-2011 at 09:03 PM.
    All the best - Glutton 4 Punishment
    Freelance shrub butcher and weed removal operative.

  2. #2
    Nicos's Avatar
    Nicos is offline 'Allo 'Allo !
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    Do they run with the other cockeral now???

    How many gals do you have ( yup- I'm sorry- I've lost count!!!)

    I had 2 brothers grow up together. One was the boss early on ( actually the smaller of the two)
    They all ran together and both watched out for the gals and their chicks. All was fine for a couple of years when the no 2 male got a bit bolshy and managed to get his eye pecked out.
    He's now quite a loner but seems happy to get his leg over from time to time! ( cover your ears children!)
    ( ha!- horror and sex in two lines...we don't half discuss interesting stuff on here!)

    Basically- I've no idea- but if you have 12 or more gals I'm sure you could have 2 cockerals- it's if they'd get on that is the worry.
    In the end - you won't know until you try.
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  3. #3
    Scarlet's Avatar
    Scarlet is online now Gone with the Wind
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    I would always keep two if you have enough girls to go around! ( I think i read you had 30+) Just incase something happens to one of them. If they don't get on - you can always have a good sunday lunch. It often depends on their temperament. I despatch the nasty ones.

  4. #4
    RichmondHens is offline Early Fruiter
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    There's no reason why you can't, but from what you've said about Asbo I wonder whether he would tolerate another male in his territory. Try it and see, but get your hospital quarters ready just in case. I have two cocks together in a couple of my enclosures, but only one in all the others. Some of my boys just won't have another male near them and will fight to the death given the opportunity.

    In any case, even if they do get on, the dominant male will still be the one having "mating rights". If the other one gets a look in Asbo may well take to knocking him off mid hump which although funny to see, can result in injury. Make sure the enclosure is large enough to accommodate them both with plenty of obstacles (bushes, log piles, bales etc) for the subordinate to hide behind otherwise he could be pushed into a corner and trapped.

  5. #5
    Glutton4...'s Avatar
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    The two youngsters are separate from the main flock at the moment. We are now down to 29 Girls, and they have over about a quarter of an acre of assorted ground to scratch around in. Part bare soil, part large conifer windbreak, part grass paddock.

    When I had all four boys together, all they did was fight, however, now two have 'gone' the other two seem fine together. I have a customer with a very small flock, around 6-8 hens, and she runs 3 Roos with them as she can't bring herself to despatch them. They seem very happy, but they do have an enormous garden to free-range in, and keep out of harm's way.
    All the best - Glutton 4 Punishment
    Freelance shrub butcher and weed removal operative.

  6. #6
    RichmondHens is offline Early Fruiter
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    Cocks raised together as brothers often get on perfectly well, although my experience has been that it is very dependent on breed/type. However it is a lot harder to introduce mature cocks to each other, so if you are going to do it, do it sooner rather than later then the younger boys will learn their place very quickly, assuming that Asbo will accept their presence in the first place. If you are lucky after a few days of running around and a scuffle or two the younger ones will know their place and keep out of Asbo's way.

    But I would recommend that if your intention is ultimately to eat them, then they are best left separate. Once put in with Asbo, they will get a lot more exercise being run around and will fail to make any more weight, in fact they may likely lose some.

  7. #7
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    I had two cocks who where brothers and all was well until they got to that age I went up one day and it was like a blood bath they where all alive just covered in blood. Kept them seperate after that

  8. #8
    Snadger's Avatar
    Snadger is offline Dundiggin
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    The good thing about cockerels is that if you want to integrate two flocks of 'laydees' just chuck a cockerel in with them. He will act as referee and make for an easier transition.

    (Not that I support Andy Grey's comments in any way........but in this instance a laydee referee will not achieve the same result)

    I think, for breeding purposes 6 or 7 laydees per cockerel gives the best fertility and is less hassle to the girls?
    My Majesty made for him a garden anew in order
    to present to him vegetables and all beautiful flowers.- Offerings of Thutmose III to Amon-Ra (1500 BCE)

    Diversify & prosper



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