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Thread: cockerel recipes!

  1. #9
    squibbs is offline Seedling
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    Our last 2 cocks were skinned and the breasts turned into breaded chicken strips with the help of my daughter - the ones she didnt eat went in the freezer. The legs were covered in barbeque sauce for me.

  2. #10
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    Just thought, there's a video on youtube (can't access here in work, grr!) of Gordon Ramsey showing you how to joint a chicken up. I use that method everytime we buy a chicken now (rather than buying prepared skinned breat fillets). Legs/wings are prepared and can be roasted when using the oven and taken to work for lunch/as a snack

    Carcasses are saved up (frozen) until we've 2/3 and then we make stock with them (from frozen.. got that idea from HFW).

  3. #11
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    Found thread with help of Mr Giggle... Is a bit dated

    Had to help out the neighbour last night to dispatch a number of cockerels and the old parent one. Last time I got one of the older cockerels, it was very gamey and quite stringy. Been doing some reading and the answer seems to be prepare bird and store in fridge for a week to allow it to tenderise.


    Any other ideas on how to cook?
    Thinking slow cooker to make stock and soup with juices curry or something with meat.

    Any more exciting ideas perhaps with a red wine marinade.
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  4. #12
    bikermike is offline Cropper
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    coq au vin is the traditional french way (basically stewed in wine onions mushrooms and garlic)

    so called as it's a way of cooking the older stringier bird. Elizabeth David would be my starting point
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  5. #13
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    Snadger is offline Dundiggin
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    As mentioned eight years ago, spatchcocked on the Barbie!
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  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snadger View Post
    As mentioned eight years ago, spatchcocked on the Barbie!
    Think he is a bit too mature for that. His boys may be well suited.

    His brother made brown chicken stock with no additional colouring.
    Last edited by 4Shoes; 16-09-2018 at 03:22 PM.
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  7. #15
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    Scarlet is offline O'Hara
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Shoes View Post
    Had to help out the neighbour last night to dispatch a number of cockerels and the old parent one. Last time I got one of the older cockerels, it was very gamey and quite stringy. Been doing some reading and the answer seems to be prepare bird and store in fridge for a week to allow it to tenderise.
    Hanging, guts in will tenderise the meat. I would often hang a bird for 5 or 6 days in cool weather. Two weeks for turkeys prior to Christmas. Though older birds, like old wild game the meat can be past its best. Even slow cooking won't make much difference though removing the large leg tendons when preparing can help. Home reared birds (IMO) are gamey, chickens that are sold for a fiver are barely 6 weeks old, their meat is white, tender and a bit bland - something that most of us have grown used too....you can't compare it to a slow growing table bird reared for that purpose. Feeding well prior to slaughter, finishing pellets and then a week on corn can help but the taste is still very different to a cheap bird in the local supermarket. That said, I wouldn't bother with "old parent birds" they don't make a great dinner. Old hens that have been used for laying get to live after they've finished laying.

    Best way to cook the tough bits of any old bird ( legs and wings) wild goose as well as chickens is confit( again IMO ) Don't be put off by the oil, you can cook several small batches in the same oil if you don't want to use too much oil and then store cooked chicken in the fridge/freezer if you've made extras.
    https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/ch...s-and-escarole
    Last edited by Scarlet; 16-09-2018 at 03:52 PM.
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  8. #16
    muck lover is offline Tuber
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    I think I would struggle to kill and butcher/prepare a chicken for cooking. Unless we were starving.
    Did you folks go to a course or whatever to learn what to do?
    Scarlet likes this.

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