Grow Your Own Magazine

Navbar button growfruitandveg.co.uk Logo
Forum Navigation

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 17
Like Tree13Likes

Thread: Advice on starting a raspberry patch

  1. #9
    nickdub is online now Early Fruiter
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Ross-on-Wye
    Posts
    2,163

    Default

    Some sensible advice given already - I'd just add one word of caution about accepting offsets from other people's plants, make sure as far as you can that the donor plants are really growing well and productively, as raspberry virus is fairly common, and really means that plants that are infected are not worth growing.

  2. #10
    Snadger's Avatar
    Snadger is online now Dundiggin
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Durham. Pink Panther territory
    Posts
    23,215

    Default

    I had a setup like Scarlets. Stout post at each end of the row, small cross piece at bottom and longer cross piece higher up. Stretch wires between the ends of the cross pieces and tie canes into the cross wires at alternate sides. Keeps rasps tidy and easy to pick.
    Nannysally99 and Gillykat like this.
    My Majesty made for him a garden anew in order
    to present to him vegetables and all beautiful flowers.- Offerings of Thutmose III to Amon-Ra (1500 BCE)

    Diversify & prosper



  3. #11
    marchogaeth's Avatar
    marchogaeth is offline Early Fruiter
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Preseli Hills North Pembrokeshire
    Posts
    2,234
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I don't think anyone has said this yet but they don't like to be planted deep, some as shallow as 1 1/2" so check for the cultivar you buy. Cold roots in the winter promotes fruiting.

    I only grow Autumn ones - nobwires necessary. You should cut them off at ground level at the end of the season which can just be done with a brush cutter or hedge cutter. I cut half of mine off half way and pull out the last season canes - this gives fruit earlier. Also if you cut them down after Christmas, the dead canes make a good wildlife habitat.
    Gillykat likes this.
    "A life lived in fear is a life half lived."

    PS. I just don't have enough time to say hello to everyone as they join so please take this as a delighted to see you here!

  4. #12
    4Shoes's Avatar
    4Shoes is online now Cropper
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Wigtownshire
    Posts
    1,127
    Blog Entries
    11

    Default

    I find the Autumn fruit are too late here in Wigtownshire to get a good Autumn crop, so I've started to grow them as "Summer Fruiting". i.e. You treat them like summer canes - cut out the old canes and tidy up this season - you'll get a reasonable summer crop followed by limited fruit into the Autumn.


    I have summer canes too, so plan that when I move them to just retain the summer stock.
    Babru likes this.

  5. #13
    AllotmentMummy is offline Seedling
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Banbury
    Posts
    47

    Default

    Thank you everyone, those are really helpful tips!
    Nicos likes this.

  6. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Nottingham
    Posts
    545

    Default

    I second Marchogaeth - just grow autumn fruited. I grow Polka and they crop from July through to November and I chop them down to the ground in December/January. They don't need any other work. No need for supports.

    As regards being too close together, I've got two rows of (originally) 10 canes in a bed 20ft x 5ft and pick from the edges. Because there are no supports its easy to reach across.
    marchogaeth and Gillykat like this.

  7. #15
    Kirk is offline Cropper
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    S Cambs/N Herts
    Posts
    1,381

    Default

    I would also advise to just grow Autumn ones, simply easier to manage as the basic principle is to let them grow, they produce fruit then you cut them back to ground level. That sort of covers March to November. You have a break over Christmas and the cycle stars again the following March.

    They will spread and they will thicken up, a single cane will become say 3 canes in a group next year, the next year the same occurs. And while thickening up they are throwing out runners.

    Do not mix Autumn and Summer varities, pruning becomes just about impossible then.

    They are shallow rooted so add a layer of mulch to maintain moisture. They are actually woodland plants.
    Last edited by Kirk; 10-01-2019 at 05:01 PM.
    marchogaeth likes this.

  8. #16
    Gillykat's Avatar
    Gillykat is offline Tuber
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Alnwick, Northumberland
    Posts
    729

    Default

    I got 3 Polka last year and temporarily potted them up in large pots.....and forgot to put them in the ground I'll get them in next week when I'm off work and doing a lot of work on the plot.

    I also grow Joan J (autumn) and LOVE them for size and flavour I recently dug up 4 offshoots from my main plant and I'll get them planted next week too in a permanent bed.

    I'll sort out some summer varieties at some point Got some growing behind the greenhouse and they're awesome.....got no idea what variety they are though as they ere already there when I took over the plot
    marchogaeth likes this.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts