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Thread: What order should I tackle jobs in on my new plot?

  1. #33
    AllotmentMummy is offline Seedling
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atta View Post
    I tried to cover what I can as well. Phaccelia is good grpund cover and looks beautifull with flowers attracting bees.
    What do you mean by going organic.For me its like I wouldnt use pesticides or herbicides (comfrey or nettle tea only) but for next season I am getting standard NPK fertilizer. Its very dissapointing when the veggies grow small.
    Hey Atta - thanks for the ground cover suggestion. For me keeping it organic would be avoiding weed killers and using manures/leaf mould etc. for improving the soil. Will have to keep an eye on output size!

  2. #34
    Chestnut is offline Tuber
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllotmentMummy View Post
    Awesome advice thanks Chestnut! Have planted some of the onions in pots - will it get frosty in the greenhouse (unheated) do you think?
    If they’re autumn planting varieties, they should be ok even with the odd bit of frost. In the greenhouse they will be cosier - but you might need to take them out in spring so they don’t get too hot and bolt.
    My plot has whiterot in the soil, and my garden is quite shady, so I havent had much luck with onions so far ;o
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  3. #35
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    Snoop Puss is offline Early Fruiter
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    Hello and welcome.

    Onions for planting out in autumn will do better in the ground or in pots rather than sitting around till spring. Overwintering onions and garlic are very hardy. You don't say where you are, but they're really unlikely to be bothered by frost inside or outside a greenhouse.

    If you're likely to move, are you sure you want to go to the effort of putting in fruit trees? It could be years before you get a decent harvest. Might you do better with soft fruit instead (currant and gooseberry bushes)?

    If you are keen to put in fruit trees, I'd put them in now (they do better planted earlier rather than later in spring).

    Then tackle the beds. Cover as much as you can as deep as you can. Not easy to get all the material that you need for no-dig but it can be done. Don't forget you have to provide lots of mulch every year, not just the first year. So you'll be wanting to make room for compost bins or bays.

    As for asparagus, it's more expensive buying in crowns than growing from seeds, but growing from seeds is a slow process and you wouldn't be putting the plants out till 2020 anyway (if I've understood the process of growing asparagus from seed), so it would give you another year to get the bed properly sorted rather than having to have it done in time for spring next year.

    As Baldy says, don't panic. Lots of friendly folk on here willing to share experience and knowledge, so ask away.

    Best wishes and good luck.
    Note to self: Getting too old not to have a life.

  4. #36
    AllotmentMummy is offline Seedling
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chestnut View Post
    If they’re autumn planting varieties, they should be ok even with the odd bit of frost. In the greenhouse they will be cosier - but you might need to take them out in spring so they don’t get too hot and bolt.
    My plot has whiterot in the soil, and my garden is quite shady, so I havent had much luck with onions so far ;o
    Really helpful info thanks Chestnut. Will keep them in the greenhouse and then bring them out in spring!

  5. #37
    AllotmentMummy is offline Seedling
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snoop Puss View Post
    Hello and welcome.

    Onions for planting out in autumn will do better in the ground or in pots rather than sitting around till spring. Overwintering onions and garlic are very hardy. You don't say where you are, but they're really unlikely to be bothered by frost inside or outside a greenhouse.

    If you're likely to move, are you sure you want to go to the effort of putting in fruit trees? It could be years before you get a decent harvest. Might you do better with soft fruit instead (currant and gooseberry bushes)?

    If you are keen to put in fruit trees, I'd put them in now (they do better planted earlier rather than later in spring).

    Then tackle the beds. Cover as much as you can as deep as you can. Not easy to get all the material that you need for no-dig but it can be done. Don't forget you have to provide lots of mulch every year, not just the first year. So you'll be wanting to make room for compost bins or bays.

    As for asparagus, it's more expensive buying in crowns than growing from seeds, but growing from seeds is a slow process and you wouldn't be putting the plants out till 2020 anyway (if I've understood the process of growing asparagus from seed), so it would give you another year to get the bed properly sorted rather than having to have it done in time for spring next year.

    As Baldy says, don't panic. Lots of friendly folk on here willing to share experience and knowledge, so ask away.

    Best wishes and good luck.
    Thanks for all the useful tips Snoop Puss, really helpful. I'm down south so quite mild here so agree the greenhouse is unlikely to get frosty inside. An allotment committee member encouraged me to put in fruit trees saying I'd get a harvest from year one or two but sounds like that may not be the case? I wanted to put something down that end of the plot so it is officially cultivated but I'm liking your idea of fruit bushes as an alternative!

    I think I might dual run the asparagus and buy some crowns and grow some from seed. For the onward mulching of the plot yes its a bit of a burden. I have a tree to cut down which I am hoping to wood chip and get dropped off at the plot but it'll take several years for it to decompose I think? We have a good local farmer with lots of manure so that'll keep me going till then hopefully!

  6. #38
    bikermike is offline Cropper
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    if you put in raspberries, you can cover them from all known pests apart from the small child. Once they get the taste for them, you'll never see another berry again...

  7. #39
    Chestnut is offline Tuber
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    I haven’t planted any fruit trees yet, but I have been browsing websites trying to decide what to plant!

    Our allotment site has a height limit for trees, so we don’t shade other plots too much, so I have only been looking at trees on dwarfing rootstocks. It seems that many of these will begin to produce fruit 1-3 years after planting, which is why they are often used for commercial orchards (as well as not need ing high ladders to harvest).

    The advantage of planting now is that it gives you ‘cultivated area’ but less time spent harvesting for the first couple of years. Hopefully by then your little ones will be a bit more effective at ‘helping’ at harvest time ;-)
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  8. #40
    Kirk is offline Cropper
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    I have the approach that organic and dig free sound really nice, but if you want it clear and things dead, then making them dead with extreme prejudice may be called for.

    Laying cardboard will kill off the green stuff, but likely do little to the roots. And I guess the idea is to remove any covering and grow stuff in a few months. Believe me those roots and weed seeds are just waiting for that time.

    Guess 3 years and better 5 years of cover will do more, but equally guess the whole lot covered for that time is not an option, or not a sensible option.

    No weed is going to roll over and die at the sight of a layer or two of cardboard.

    Digging the perennial weeds out is good. Takes time and effort. But damn it gets you fit (fitter).

    Mine was done with the extreme prejudice method - 2 good sprays of glyphosphate, 10 days apart. Then I dug it. That was the only time I had to use it, and that was 25+ years ago.

    If you want the weeds dead then you cannot realistically be nice to them.
    nickdub and AllotmentMummy like this.

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