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Thread: Root Riots

  1. #17
    Aberdeenplotter is offline Gardening Guru
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    Snoop, the seeds germinate brilliantly and the roots don't take long to come through the sides and bottom of the cubes . At that stage you absolutely need to pot the cubes up and surround the roots with compost for the roots to grow in to otherwise the seedlings just stop growing. . After potting up, I found that watering was an issue. They seemed to be drinking the stuff. Now, after they have been potted on again, that problem seems to have gone. I did sow a batch in root riots and a batch in a tray of compost which needed pricked out fairly shortly after germination and these also have been potted on again. As I type, there is no difference between the two batches.

    So conclusion is that although the germination rate was better and no pricking out was needed with the Root Riots they caused a bit of hassle with watering and cost at 6 for a tray of 24 - 25p each.

    I haven't yet tried them to root cuttings although I have seen pics of the developing root sytems in that process. Given that most plants being propagated cuttings would cost more than some onion plants, that would seem to be more cost effective.

    If I was using them again for seeds, at the outset I'd be sinking the cubes into small pots of compost so that hopefully the watering issues would be avoided.

    I hope that gives you enough info SNoop but just ask if you need to know any more.

  2. #18
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    That's brilliant info, AP. I was trying to work out what the problems were. I might still go ahead for some things. Surrounding them in compost would save buying any trays too. And I'm very happy to avoid pricking out. I'll give them a go for some of my expensive seeds.

    Did you only use them for smallish seeds or did you try them with larger ones like courgettes?
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  3. #19
    Aberdeenplotter is offline Gardening Guru
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    I have ony used them for onions.
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  4. #20
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    You must love your onions!

    Thanks again.
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  5. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snoop Puss View Post
    You must love your onions!
    Thanks again.
    Ah, but does he know his onions?

    had to put that in,
    AP, after using that guide you posted to let you know where the stockists are I bought a tray of 20 which I got for a fiver, though there were bags of 50 for 12. I bought the tray to trial them, but I have found that my soil blocker is quite successful with onion seeds as I can make small blocks for seed sowing, and once germinated place these into larger blocks, and after you saying watering was a problem I place all the blocks on to capillary matting which seems to work ok for now
    it may be a struggle to reach the top, but once your over the hill your problems start.

    Member of the Nutters Club but I think I am just there to make up the numbers

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    ^That's interesting, Rary. Do you make a special mix for the soil blockers?
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  7. #23
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    Snoop I used a 3-2-1 mix that's 3 of compost 2 of soil and 1 of course sand and water the water was added till I got the consistency I wanted, which is it holding together when pressed and not only felt but looked moist, I also put a bit of worm compost in with the mix even though it is said you don't need to feed seeds as I will not be transplanting the seedlings but moving on into larger blocks, if you look up soil blockers it might give you an idea what I am referring to you can also find a guide in how to make your own blocker, but after experiencing using one I reckon the same mix could be rolled into a ball by hand, flatten a top and bottom put a wee depression in the top and sow the seed into it, I will try this way myself and if it works I will sell you a soil blocker
    it may be a struggle to reach the top, but once your over the hill your problems start.

    Member of the Nutters Club but I think I am just there to make up the numbers

  8. #24
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    I watched Monty Don make his soil blocker mix. Not easy to find the ingredients here. But your mix sounds simple enough.

    I'll try some root riots for my fancy seeds, paper pots for most things and washing-up bowls for onions. No special treatment for them here, I'm afraid.
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