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Spanish Tomato Varieties - Wanted

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  • Spanish Tomato Varieties - Wanted

    I have an interest in Spanish Tomatoes and wonder if any Vine Members have grown any true Spanish varieties of Tomatoes. A couple that come to mind are De Colgar and Zamorano, but I would be interested in names of others you may have grown.
    Last edited by mcsee; 03-10-2018, 06:22 AM.
    I love growing tomatoes.

  • #2
    Hi, mcsee. De Colgar simply means for hanging. It's possible to find several different types of hanging tomatoes, though they are generally all thick-skinned (for obvious reasons) and slightly pinkish in colour. Variations include shape (some pointier than others) and slight greenishness around the shoulders in some cases. Some have potato leaves, others do not. I grow a couple of these every year and buy them as plug plants, so I get what I'm given. Always good, though.

    The only other 'true' Spanish tomato that I knowingly grow is Rosa (or Rosado) de Barbastro (Barbastro is a town). Here's a link in Spanish:
    https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomate_rosa_de_Barbastro

    I can't buy seeds for these locally, so just buy plug plants from a nearby nursery.

    I grow my other toms from seeds ('British' and Italian varieties).
    Last edited by Snoop Puss; 03-10-2018, 09:07 AM.
    Living in north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the info on De Colgar Snoop Puss, I'll scratch it off my list. Thanks also for another of the Rosado varieties, I have two of them as seedlings at present.

      I'll try and find some varieties that are available.
      I love growing tomatoes.

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      • #4
        Monsterrat? I grew it once, makes a good tomato for stuffing.

        https://www.plant-world-seeds.com/st...seed_item/4744

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        • #5
          If you speak Spanish, have a look at this article (courtesy of Hola! magazine of all things):
          https://www.hola.com/cocina/noticias...es-variedades/

          Google Translate might come up with a translation into English for you.

          It would be a shame not to grow any hanging tomatoes if you can find a variety you regard as 'true', like the one mentioned in the article. They make absolutely the best tomatoes for a fried tomato over winter. I'm always amazed that British supermarkets don't sell them, as they'd transport well due to the thick skins. When cooked, they go a good red colour and taste wonderful, just like I imagine the Platonic ideal of a tomato would be.
          Living in north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep.

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          • #6
            ^Montserrat, though I do quite like the idea of a Monsterrat. They're picked quite green here, so I'd never considered them for stuffing. That's worth thinking about. I'm not much into greenish toms, so I've never grown them. I'll give them a try next year. Thanks, T.S.
            Living in north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep.

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            • #7
              This jogged my memory a bit, and in one of my old notebooks I have listed Ramallet as a good Majorcan variety for hanging? I never did try them, perhaps I could find some seed for next year

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