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Sweet Peas 2021….

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  • #16
    The exact height when you take out the tips is not important. The main aim is to get a bushier plant which ultimately means more flowers. I may be wrong but I believe some growers who are aiming for a few show quality flowers grow the plants as a type of cordon with just one main stem, so they produce the best and longest stemmed blooms but only a few, so the plant puts all its energy into those.

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    • #17
      I pinch mine out when they have 4 sets of leaves they seem to do fine. Not got around to sowing any yet so will have to do it this month.

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      • #18
        I tried autumn sown ones years ago but found them to be poor plants come spring, pretty weather beaten. Probably better now I have a cold frame though.

        However I now sow some in January for early flowers, and some more in March to keep the show going in a separate spot. I just took mine out on Sunday, and they had done really well, despite the average summer we had here in Edinburgh.

        I choose named varieties supposed to have best scent. The one that did best for me this year, by a mile, was Anniversary. Loads of flowers with long stems (just left to themselves to grow), flowered all summer, fantastic perfume.
        Last edited by Babru; 27-10-2020, 08:04 AM.
        Mostly flowers, some fruit and veg, at the seaside in Edinburgh.

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        • #19
          Just goes to show I think that where you live has a big effect on what methods will work best for you in the garden - no surprise really :-)

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          • #20
            I am in Edinburgh too. 2 of my 3 sweet pea wigwams are still in the garden and flowering. They were planted in the autumn can’t believe they have lasted so long.

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            • #21
              Did you actually plant out in flowering position last autumn annie8?
              Last edited by Babru; 01-11-2020, 09:15 AM.
              Mostly flowers, some fruit and veg, at the seaside in Edinburgh.

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              • #22
                No I didn’t plant them out until the spring.

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                • #23
                  I have a sweet pea plant growing through a shrub, a self seeder from 2 years ago, and even though there has been some frost, the plant is still looking healthy, though no flowers now
                  it may be a struggle to reach the top, but once your over the hill your problems start.

                  Member of the Nutters Club but I think I am just there to make up the numbers

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                  • #24
                    I had a self seed plant this year, and was impressed by the scent and length of stem. The flowers were blue. Someone I worked with years ago told me she saved sweet pea seeds and they all came up blue. We figured they must revert to the original sweet pea colour. For this reason, I've never bothered to save seeds, as I like a mix of colours.

                    Does anyone know if they do all come up blue? If they do, how do growers get colours!
                    Mostly flowers, some fruit and veg, at the seaside in Edinburgh.

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                    • #25
                      Babru I save sweet pea seeds mine are always a variety of colours, wonder if its 'an old wives tale' them all coming through blue.

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                      • #26
                        I've found that sweet peas mostly come true from seed: save seed from a pink one and you'll get pink flowers next year. I always label one or two flowers of each variety before they set seed so I can be sure of collecting an even mix.
                        My gardening blog: In Spades, last update 30th April 2018.
                        Chrysanthemum notes page here.

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                        • #27
                          I save my seeds year after year and they all come in a variety of colours.

                          And when your back stops aching,
                          And your hands begin to harden.
                          You will find yourself a partner,
                          In the glory of the garden.

                          Rudyard Kipling.sigpic

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                          • #28
                            Thanks everyone, very interesting. It looks like my colleague accidentally saved seed only from blue flowers
                            Mostly flowers, some fruit and veg, at the seaside in Edinburgh.

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