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My cockerel, Joe

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  • mr darcy
    replied
    Worse THREAT over the weekend was when he & his girls got separated – they had escaped around next door. He decided to run sideways at me with wings down – I wasn't sure whether he was going to attack me or grab me behind my neck!!!! Thankfully, he changed his mind when he was about 6 ft away – did the pick stuff up and drop it routine – just to make me realise, it's his bit of the garden!
    Expect I will have to experiment with the pick up & cuddle theory – although he is chick-raised by me!! so has had plenty of cuddles when he was younger. Mind you, he's only 10 months now so it's not that long ago – although, perhaps in chicken years, that's a life time ago????


    this sounds horribly familiar!! but I wish you luck of course!
    Last edited by mr darcy; 17-02-2010, 11:35 AM.

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  • Gorsty
    replied
    Separation

    Originally posted by RichmondHens View Post
    If it is practical (and I appreciate it may not be) I also wonder whether isolating him for a few days where he has no hens to protect may make a difference. Do you have a separate coop or run you can put him in, away from the others?
    Yes, I do have another coop but it's not very big at all - it was built for Alice, our little Warren when she first came to live with us and was beating up the young Barnevelders. I should have known then what Joe was going to be like cos he beat her up, the first day she arrived and he was all of a few weeks old and she was POL.

    Anyhow, the run itself is only about 2 ft wide by 6 ft long so not very big at all for something the size of Joe. Would I need to put him somewhere that he couldn't see the girls at all - they free range so that would mean at the front of the house.

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  • Gorsty
    replied
    Hi folks sorry haven't logged on since Sunday.

    The good news is that I haven't been attacked OUTRIGHT since Friday but Joe is shadowing me around the garden which is a bit disturbing daren't turn my back on him in case he has a go!

    Worse THREAT over the weekend was when he & his girls got separated they had escaped around next door. He decided to run sideways at me with wings down I wasn't sure whether he was going to attack me or grab me behind my neck!!!! Thankfully, he changed his mind when he was about 6 ft away did the pick stuff up and drop it routine just to make me realise, it's his bit of the garden!

    Have decided to try and not react to his threats I always carry one of those tubular bird feeders or something though = to place in between me and my legs (if need be)

    Expect I will have to experiment with the pick up & cuddle theory although he is chick-raised by me!! so has had plenty of cuddles when he was younger. Mind you, he's only 10 months now so it's not that long ago although, perhaps in chicken years, that's a life time ago????

    Not wishing to being even more negative there is another problem with the picking off the perch routine guess where his perch is. YES, at the other end of the house where I can barely reach!!!!

    Will see how we go.

    Anyhow, THANKS for being there for me.

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  • Bephlam
    replied
    I've only ever had friendly, gentle cockerels...thankfully. Perhaps because I reared them from chicks...who knows. I don't think I'd be able to cope if I had one as aggressive as yours is...but I wouldn't pot him....can't!

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  • its hilly
    replied
    If I need to handle anyone without them fussing I go and pick them up after theyve roosted. They go much quieter then.
    That said (fingers crossed) I've got some bloomin big boys and none off them are aggressive. Dont like being picked up sometimes but never aggressive (except Trousers my banty buff orp who's not big enough to cause any damage). When I first moved a horse to next door to where I am now they had a big light sussex cockeral who was definately illegitimate!! He would go for anyone who walked anywhere near him and drew blood frequently. As his favourite area was on the stable yard you can imagine the hassle he caused. they tried everything with him for months, but he ended up potted. Thank goodness.

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  • mr darcy
    replied
    Originally posted by Nicos View Post
    As RH suggests- can't you pick him up at night? ( or is he still very aggressive even then?)
    well as you know he is now gone BUT yes you are right, the new owner caught him at night in rthe coop and it's at night he picks him up to put him back (knackeredly!!) with the hens ah hah so that's what I never knew!!!

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  • Nicos
    replied
    As RH suggests- can't you pick him up at night? ( or is he still very aggressive even then?)

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  • mr darcy
    replied
    Originally posted by Hilary B View Post
    There are cockerels that attack because they are 'scared' and there are ones that attack because they are determined to be boss. The former need gentle treatment, the latter need to be taught that they will NEVER be boss, and SOME of these are impossible to deter while they are still breathing. Until you know which type you have there is little chance of a definitive solution (and the ones who are SURE they should be boss, the solution is dinner!)
    Even the scared ones still need to not be allowed to take control. Cuddles and being kind yes; bribery with food, could be asking for trouble!
    yes but what about the 'scareds' who are too big and aggressive to pick up??

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  • RichmondHens
    replied
    Originally posted by Gorsty View Post

    Going back to cuddles - I appreciate the theory but ...... how on earth do I get close enough to pick him up, without (a) me being attacked and (b) upsetting/frightening him? Do I wait until dark?
    Yes. Start with picking him off the roost at night, when he is quiet and sleepy. This is always a good time anyway to check over for lice and general condition. Hold legs firmly so he can't draw them up and catch you with his spurs. Tuck him under your arm and just stroke and talk to him for a bit. See if doing this nightly makes a difference.

    If it is practical (and I appreciate it may not be) I also wonder whether isolating him for a few days where he has no hens to protect may make a difference. Do you have a separate coop or run you can put him in, away from the others?

    Leave a comment:


  • Gorsty
    replied
    Originally posted by Nicos View Post
    Mght be worth seeing if someone would buy him/take him in to alter their gene pool- although having said that , you'd be breeding from an aggressive bid and encouraging that inherited behaviour in his offspring.
    I know I wouldn't breed from him as beautiful as he is! Am a bit bothered that his hormones are only going to get stronger - he's only 10 months old and spring approaches!!!!!!!

    I haven't given up on him yet so will persevere for a while & see what happens - must admit though, he's taking the pleasure out of having chickens and we do have small grand children - I'll just have to make sure he's penned up when they visit.

    We'll see.

    Thanks for the best wishes - suspect I'm going to need them !!!!!!!

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  • Nicos
    replied
    I can understand your reluctance to put him in a pot (aside from the culling issue) cos he must be fairly valuable?
    As the others have said- it could just be he needs a different home- more gals, change of environment etc?
    Might be worth seeing if someone would buy him/take him in to alter their gene pool- although having said that , you'd be breeding from an aggressive bid and encouraging that inherited behaviour in his offspring.
    Pot me thinks- as you say , he's had 8 more weeks and it looks like his aggressive side is only getting stronger as his hormones continue to develop.

    Good luck though with the handling- I still wish you luck if you're giving it a bit longer.

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  • petal
    replied
    Well, I would stick him in a pot. not all roosters turn agressive. If he gets a kid - things could turn nasty! yep, a few herbs, potatoes and veg - tell him he will go live with petal if he doesn't start to appreciate you soon..........!

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  • Nicos
    replied
    Originally posted by NSB View Post
    Also how come they are being disciplined quite strictly.
    Strangely enough , we all love our gals and are happy that the lads are there to warn/protect them as best they can ( and also to produce the odd chick or 6)

    Soooo..it does come as a bit of a shock when you go out to feed the 'gals et al' with porridge lovingly made with spice,shell, raisins and potato peeling s ...to have a cockerel jump at your face feet first brandishing 2-3"' razor blades'
    Instinct kicks in to save the old eye balls/nose..and other precious bits and bobs.
    The nearest thing to hand always comes in handy to fend off the assault..well after several attacks wouldn't you think of a tennis racquet???

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  • Gorsty
    replied
    Didn't get attacked - he had already gone to bed!

    Don't want ANY of you to think I wish to harm him - just wish he hadn't lost his respect for me. I've been around livestock all my life and have never had to deal with anything like this. Just trying to avoid having him put down.

    At the end of the day he's only doing his job - as he sees it and yes, expect he would give a dog or a fox a run for their money.

    Going back to cuddles - I appreciate the theory but ...... how on earth do I get close enough to pick him up, without (a) me being attacked and (b) upsetting/frightening him? Do I wait until dark?

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  • RichmondHens
    replied
    Originally posted by NSB View Post
    Im a little surpised at what you guys put up with with the cockerels. I keep chickens but am not allowed cockerels due to the noise.

    Can I say it may be the nature of cockerels but how come they are getting away with it, dogs that behave like that get put down!!!

    Also how come they are being disciplined quite strictly.

    Please dont be offended by im questions im just a bit shocked, maybe its my ignorance
    Most cocks to be fair are perfectly well behaved. The aggressive ones are in a minority. They are incredible characters and I probably love mine more than most of the hens.

    I do disagree with treating cocks harshly. Treating any animal in a way that may injure it is not acceptable, and usually does more harm than good anyway. Most can be "managed" with sensible handling.

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