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  • Grape cuttings

    Can rooted grape cuttings sprout new buds if they lose their existing ones, like a mature vine can, or if you lose the buds then is the cutting doomed to die?
    I ask because I have seven cuttings which I had in my mini greenhouse to protect them from the frost (they already had leaves, which I thought the frost might kill). It got very hot in there today, and a lot of the shoots and swelling buds now look worrying dry and limp, and even a little crispy. I've now moved them outside and watered them well, but I'm not sure how well they will recover...
    Last edited by ameno; 19-04-2021, 02:47 PM.

  • #2
    On the whole I'd say no, but I've written off plants in the past and had them prove me wrong.

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    • #3
      I looked into it further, and apparently grape buds are actually compound buds, with three buds inside each one. The secondary and tertiary buds will only grow if the primary one is killed or removed.
      So as long as the dormant secondary buds haven't fried as well then hopefully they'll grow back.

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      • #4
        As most grapes appear to be hybrids of at least 2 different varieties, will yours grow true to type?
        Feed the soil, not the plants.
        (helps if you have cluckies)

        Man v Squirrels, pigeons & Ants
        Bob

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        • #5
          Originally posted by fishpond View Post
          As most grapes appear to be hybrids of at least 2 different varieties, will yours grow true to type?
          They're cuttings, so of course they will. Cuttings are genetic clones of the parents.
          It sounds like maybe you are confusing hybrids with grafting, which are two very different things.

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          • #6
            Really depends what your soil dictates / possibility of disease.
            Of course you can take cuttings, but are the original vines grafted onto a different rootstock?
            Feed the soil, not the plants.
            (helps if you have cluckies)

            Man v Squirrels, pigeons & Ants
            Bob

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by fishpond View Post
              Really depends what your soil dictates / possibility of disease.
              Of course you can take cuttings, but are the original vines grafted onto a different rootstock?
              The original vine is on a different root stock, but that actually doesn't mean much in this country. Most varieties make perfectly good plants on their own roots.
              Unlike fruit trees, vines are not generally grafted to control vigour (apart from a small handful of very weak-growing varieties, which this isn't). They are grafted to grant them resistance to certain soil diseases. However, due to a combination of the climate and the lack of vine growing in general in this country, those soil diseases don't really occur here. And the variety I'm growing (Muscat Bleu) is reported to have good disease resistance on its own roots, anyway.

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              • #8
                If you didn't already know, Muscat Bleu is a hybrid.
                Feed the soil, not the plants.
                (helps if you have cluckies)

                Man v Squirrels, pigeons & Ants
                Bob

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by fishpond View Post
                  If you didn't already know, Muscat Bleu is a hybrid.
                  Well, yes, all grapes are, but that's utterly irrelevant. And, indeed, I'm not really sure why you think it is.

                  A hybrid grape is defined by what it's parents are (what gave the pollen and what produced the seeds), not what it may or may not be grafted onto.
                  One variety grafted onto another is not a "hybrid", it is simply a grafted grapevine.
                  Assuming the rootstock hasn't started growing shoots of its own, cuttings taken from a grafted plant will always be identical to the scion (just as cuttings taken from a non-grafted plant will always be identical to the parent plant). They will always come true, without question, as they will always be genetically identical.

                  It feels like you are getting confused with growing hybrids from seed. When you grow plants from seed there will be some genetic variation, and therefore a hybrid may well not grow true from seed.

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                  • #10
                    All grapes are not hybrids unless all of my books are Wrong!
                    .
                    Feed the soil, not the plants.
                    (helps if you have cluckies)

                    Man v Squirrels, pigeons & Ants
                    Bob

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by fishpond View Post
                      All grapes are not hybrids unless all of my books are Wrong!
                      .
                      Well, it depends what type of hybrid you are talking about, but all are selectively bred. There's is not one grape variety which is the same as wild grape vines.
                      You're probably talking about inter-specific hybrids, most of which are crosses between Vitis vinifera and one of the American Vitis species.

                      But regardless, none of that has any bearing on a grape vine's (or any plant's, for that matter) ability to grow true from cuttings. The cuttings are genetically identical to the parent plant, by definition, and so will always produce identical clones of the parent.

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