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Recommend my next apple tree?

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  • Recommend my next apple tree?

    I already have a few bramleys that were here when we moved in. I've planted, all quite small still:
    • Cox's orange pippin (first apples this year)
    • Egremont russet (I think, definitely a russet)
    • Winter gem
    • Pitmaston Pineapple
    • Sweet coppin (cider variety)
    • Black Dabinett (cider variety)
    • Crab apple (John Downie)
    I might have space for one more eating apple, and I'm wondering if there's some obvious omission? Specifically something disease resitant and low maintainence that will do well in NE England.

  • #2
    I was going to replace my old trees after losing them to Scab, when researching I found this helpful in making a list
    https://portlandnursery.com/docs/fru...Resistance.pdf
    If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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    • #3
      I'd say you may be missing a late dessert apple, which is the sort you pick around now but then store and can still be eating next year - my choice for this would be Ashmead's Kernel though I don't know Winter gem, so that might do the same job. Another possible would be James Grieve which is an excellent early eater which you don't see in the shops these days, and which can be grown to cooking apple size if thinned enough.

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      • #4
        I had a James Grieve, which sadly succumbed to Scab and canker, as you are further south than me, you might be ok, it is a versatile cooker/eater, nice taste too.
        If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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        • #5
          I don't know much about apple trees but I keep thinking about getting a red fleshed variety.
          There appear to be several on the market .
          I like the novelty aspect.
          As far as I am aware they have crab apple input to get the colouring so maybe that would make them more hardy for your area?

          No idea what I'm talking about...but might be worth looking into?
          "Nicos, Queen of Gooooogle" and... GYO's own Miss Marple

          Location....Normandy France

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          • #6
            If you want a late variety, I can recommend Christmas Pippin. Easily the best apple I have ever tasted. Its a Cox-like apple, but I think it tastes even better than an actual Cox. It's also far better as a tree, as the tree is more vigorous and disease-resistant (Cox are infamous for being weak growers and being susceptible to every disease under the sun), crops better with larger fruit, and the fruit keep longer.
            It's ready mid- to late-October, though, so depending on how cool your summers are it may not ripen in time.

            Originally posted by Nicos View Post
            I don't know much about apple trees but I keep thinking about getting a red fleshed variety.
            There appear to be several on the market .
            I like the novelty aspect.
            As far as I am aware they have crab apple input to get the colouring so maybe that would make them more hardy for your area?

            No idea what I'm talking about...but might be worth looking into?
            I've never heard anything good about the red-fleshed varieties. They all apparently taste rather mediocre and don't crop all that well. A gimmick, really.

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            • #7
              ^^^ I did wonder!
              "Nicos, Queen of Gooooogle" and... GYO's own Miss Marple

              Location....Normandy France

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              • #8
                Nicos I've had a red fleshed apple for a few years now, it's called Pixi Rosso and is fantastic. Lovely crisp, tangy, yet sweet flesh. Delicious as well as pretty. The blossom is a beautiful deep magenta kind of colour. Well worth having.
                Last edited by peanut; 23-09-2020, 11:47 AM.
                Always aim for the best result possible not the best possible result

                Forever indebted to Potstubsdustbins

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by nickdub View Post
                  I'd say you may be missing a late dessert apple, which is the sort you pick around now but then store and can still be eating next year - my choice for this would be Ashmead's Kernel though I don't know Winter gem, so that might do the same job. Another possible would be James Grieve which is an excellent early eater which you don't see in the shops these days, and which can be grown to cooking apple size if thinned enough.
                  I think my Winter Gem does alrgely match this late dessert idea although it's a bit of a novelty variety: https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/110282...em-(D)/Details

                  A friend recently harvested their James Grieve and it looked nice; looking it up it seems like it could be a great option to "fill in the gaps" as a good solid all-rounder.

                  I was wondering about possibly removing TWO of my Bramleys and replacing one with a different cooking variety. Any suggestions?
                  Last edited by d000hg; 25-09-2020, 08:38 AM.

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                  • #10
                    We have Belle de Boscoop

                    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belle_de_Boskoop

                    https://www.orangepippin.com/varieti...lle-de-boskoop

                    Its a lovely eater , stores pretty well and can be cooked to a purée or chunky halves.
                    Last edited by Nicos; 25-09-2020, 09:27 AM.
                    "Nicos, Queen of Gooooogle" and... GYO's own Miss Marple

                    Location....Normandy France

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      "A friend recently harvested their James Grieve and it looked nice; looking it up it seems like it could be a great option to "fill in the gaps" as a good solid all-rounder.

                      I was wondering about possibly removing TWO of my Bramleys and replacing one with a different cooking variety. Any suggestions?"

                      If you get too many Bramley apples I'd say give one of your trees to a friend and try a James Grieve instead (or graft one over). As mentioned James Grieves doubles as a cooking apple if well thinned - the only reason it's not grown more commercially is that the fruit bruises easily when ripe so it's tricky to get it on to shop shelves in good condition.

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                      • #12
                        My Bramleys are well-established trees, not sure but could be 15-20 years old so I don't think they can be transplanted. In fact getting the stump out of the ground will be fun enough!

                        I hadn't thought about grafting but I'm not sure if that's feasible. Certainly there's a nice root system there.

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                        • #13
                          Sometimes you need to wait 5-6 years until the apple tree begins to bear fruit. We had several of these "sleeping beauties". The tree grows on its own, endures winter, but does not bear fruit. And they fed, and whatever they did. And if you only recently planted yours, then as for me, it is quite normal that there are no fruits yet.

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                          • #14
                            Grafting is certainly possible as long as you can get the scion wood. Depending on the size of the tree you might need a stepladder to reach branches of the optimum size. U-tube is a good reference as people have put videos of all sorts of grafting and budding on there. I found wedge grafting to be the easiest on any moderately sized branch from pencil thickness up to about 1" diameter.

                            I'd go as far as to say that anyone who can rewire a plug has enough dexterity to be able to graft successfully - the other ingredients required are a bit of knowledge as to when and how + patience and persistence to acquire the manual skill.

                            Obviously a 15 years old is a major asset and the only way you can capitalise on that growing time its had is by grafting. Really apart from your time you have nothing to lose by trying it, as the cost is minimal and if you are worried about the grafts not taking just plant another young tree of the new variety you choose somewhere else in your garden, which you can transplant if the grafting fails and you decide to scrap one of your mature trees.


                            PS 30 or 40 foot high trees can be transplanted, its just not usually done because of the cost - something like a mini digger would be required in the case of moving your Bramleys I expect

                            PPS requests for scion wood have often been met on here through the kindness of vine members in the past

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by nickdub View Post
                              Grafting is certainly possible as long as you can get the scion wood. Depending on the size of the tree you might need a stepladder to reach branches of the optimum size. U-tube is a good reference as people have put videos of all sorts of grafting and budding on there. I found wedge grafting to be the easiest on any moderately sized branch from pencil thickness up to about 1" diameter.

                              I'd go as far as to say that anyone who can rewire a plug has enough dexterity to be able to graft successfully - the other ingredients required are a bit of knowledge as to when and how + patience and persistence to acquire the manual skill.

                              Obviously a 15 years old is a major asset and the only way you can capitalise on that growing time its had is by grafting. Really apart from your time you have nothing to lose by trying it, as the cost is minimal and if you are worried about the grafts not taking just plant another young tree of the new variety you choose somewhere else in your garden, which you can transplant if the grafting fails and you decide to scrap one of your mature trees.


                              PS 30 or 40 foot high trees can be transplanted, its just not usually done because of the cost - something like a mini digger would be required in the case of moving your Bramleys I expect

                              PPS requests for scion wood have often been met on here through the kindness of vine members in the past
                              Very interesting, thanks. I'm familiar with grafting a branch and the way small trees are nearly always grafted but I had never heard of stump/trunk grafting. Looking online it seems you can literally fell the tree to ground level, get a branch of another tree, and bung it in. I need to find some more info online but this sounds a great idea and as you say what is there to lose - worst case I end up having to pull the stump out anyway.

                              I found someone online saying you can graft into a stump up to a few years after felling the tree... the root system stays alive for quite a long time?

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