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  • Medlar Tree

    I am thinking off buying some fruit trees - ideally to grow in pots, as I have only a backyard. It would be nice to eventually to have fruit from them, but the tree would still fulfill it's purpose to put oxygen into the atmosphere. But I was thinking off the more unusual ones, i.e. quince & medlar. I have seen Medlars that can be grown in pots, but would it survive up here in the North East of England. My yard is quite sheltered & does get the sun in the afternoon

  • #2
    I know that medlars can be grown in the ground in Scotland, so I expect the tree itself will survive just fine, and medlars will tolerate partial shade. The only question is whether the flowers might get hit by late cold in your area. Medlars do flower late and everyone claims the flowers are very frost tolerant for that reason, but I have had problems getting mine to consistently set fruit in Nottingham and the damage looks like frost when I cut the unopened buds open.

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    • #3
      I have a medlar and a quince, both bought a couple of years ago. The medlar has fruit for the first time, the quince has flowered but not fruited.I wouldn't want to grow either in a pot as they're already quite big.
      Have you eaten medlars and quince?
      A Chicken walks with small steps. Be more Chicken
      https://gardenchicken.blogspot.com/
      @realveggiechicken

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      • #4
        I second the recommendation to try one. Quince is not a fruit to eat raw, and isn't commonly found in parks either. But at least here in Nottinghamshire, there are a few parks I know of with medlars in them, and since no-one else wants the fruit you can just take a few in October or November. Maybe you can find one in your area if you keep your eyes open?

        Many people don't like raw medlars, but I personally would recommend them. I love eating them raw... which is why I'm so disappointed about the struggle to get a decent yield of them from my own garden. After bletting, they taste like apple puree but with a slightly coarser oaty texture and with a hint of cinnamon and lemon juice mixed in.
        Last edited by chrisdb; 25-08-2019, 04:07 PM.

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        • #5
          No I haven't eaten either VC. And to reply to your question db, regarding frost, where I am going to put the medlar, it's quite sheltered. I know with regards to medlar fruit not to pick them straight away, but to let them blet - in other words, let them almost look overripe

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          • #6
            I've never eaten a medlar either and the ones on the tree don't really shout "try me".
            Pity you don't live nearer Chris, I could watch you eat one first.
            A Chicken walks with small steps. Be more Chicken
            https://gardenchicken.blogspot.com/
            @realveggiechicken

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            • #7
              Sounds like similar problems to the loquat, which are delicious... Here's a thread:
              https://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gr...ase_99115.html

              Some people here protect the newly set fruit by covering the tree over winter, but if it's very cold where you are, this won't be enough.

              Even if you get no fruit, the loquat tree itself is very handsome.

              As for quince, I personally love the fruit (cooked). And raw it has an amazing scent that will fill a room. But best of all is the blossom, which is really pretty.
              Living in north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by veggiechicken View Post
                I've never eaten a medlar either and the ones on the tree don't really shout "try me".
                Pity you don't live nearer Chris, I could watch you eat one first.
                It has to be said that eating them elegantly is difficult. The easiest way is just to suck all of the insides out of the skin and then spit out the big seeds afterwards.

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                • #9
                  Mmmm, definitely something to do alone.
                  Would they grow from the seeds?

                  Answer :- https://www.treeseedonline.com/store...manica%29.html

                  May be too slow growing for me to send you some seeds, Carole
                  Last edited by veggiechicken; 25-08-2019, 04:37 PM.
                  A Chicken walks with small steps. Be more Chicken
                  https://gardenchicken.blogspot.com/
                  @realveggiechicken

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                  • #10
                    You've plenty of time before they're available bare root.

                    Select varieties carefully. Had a medlar, long chopped down as all pips and poor flavour. There are some that sound very good.

                    There are lots of quince varieties. Traditionally they went in apple pies. The Greek delis used to smell fantastic when they were in stock.

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                    • #11
                      I make medlar jelly with the fruit as donated by a friend who doesn’t like to see them wasted but cant be bothered with the faff of bletting. Tried a bletted one but not to my taste at all.
                      Friend says tree very attractive in blossom

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                      • #12
                        Just thought of a medlar snag. Not sure what current root stocks are but mine was on hawthorn which did tend to sucker a lot. B***ers to pull off due to thorns! Mustn't cut else you get two for one. I used mole grips!
                        Last edited by DannyK; 29-08-2019, 07:08 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DannyK View Post
                          Just thought of a medlar snag. Not sure what current root stocks are but mine was on hawthorn which did tend to sucker a lot. B***ers to pull off due to thorns! Mustn't cut else you get two for one. I used mole grips!
                          Most people who want a dwarfing tree use quince rootstock. I think they can be grafted onto pyrus, but then you get a monster. Keepers offer mespilus rootstock as well, which they claim is similar in vigour to Quince A, although I have no clue how they propagate it. I thought the reason that mespilus isn't normally used is because it's less easily to propagate that hawthorn/quince/pyrus.

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                          • #14
                            I have this one - https://www.suttons.co.uk/Gardening/...4.htm#CMRTabs1
                            A Chicken walks with small steps. Be more Chicken
                            https://gardenchicken.blogspot.com/
                            @realveggiechicken

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