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Apple Scab - resistance

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  • Apple Scab - resistance

    I have a Lord Derby apple tree which I bought last year as a container grown. I have noticed this year it seems to have an awful lot of what I consider to be apple scab. I have read that Lord Derby has good resistance to this disease but it seems that this is not the case for me?

    I am new to fruit growing so maybe I am mistaken ?

  • #2
    I had apple scab once when my tree was young but never again,is it getting enough water,do you have a photo?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Jungle Jane View Post
      I had apple scab once when my tree was young but never again,is it getting enough water,do you have a photo?
      Thanks for the reply

      I have took some photos, i think it is getting enough water, it was planted in the lawn with about a foot clearance around and mulched with a good layer of FYM.
      Attached Files

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      • #4
        The 'scabby' appearance looks unusual for scab and might be due to over-fertilising or under-watering.

        But it's possible for scab resistance to fail, especially if the variety is, or has been, popular in your area, or if there are numerous old diseased trees nearby.

        Sometimes disease resistance varies with local soil and climate. Rootstock choice can play a part, too, since it affects which and how many nutrients get taken from the soil.

        Your tree might have been mis-labelled.

        In my experience, sometimes a newly planted tree suffers more than its fair share of disease attacks in its first year or two, possibly because it had been sprayed in the nursery but not after planting.
        On the other hand, sometimes a tree can be happy and healthy for a few years then suddenly become prone to disease.
        Last edited by FB.; 06-07-2019, 08:04 AM.
        .

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        • #5
          Originally posted by FB. View Post
          The 'scabby' appearance looks unusual for scab and might be due to over-fertilising or under-watering.

          But it's possible for scab resistance to fail, especially if the variety is, or has been, popular in your area, or if there are numerous old diseased trees nearby.

          Sometimes disease resistance varies with local soil and climate. Rootstock choice can play a part, too, since it affects which and how many nutrients get taken from the soil.

          Your tree might have been mis-labelled.

          In my experience, sometimes a newly planted tree suffers more than its fair share of disease attacks in its first year or two, possibly because it had been sprayed in the nursery but not after planting.
          On the other hand, sometimes a tree can be happy and healthy for a few years then suddenly become prone to disease.
          Thanks for the reply.

          Yeah I am a bit ham fisted when it comes to fertilising that is something I need to pay more attention to I think, not sure about the watering but maybe. I will also try and have a look at the apple trees nearby and see their condition.

          I really hope it has not been mis-labelled, i am currently chasing up a problem with a White Currant plant that has Red Currants developing

          I will tread carefully with Lord Derby and live in hope

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          • #6
            Looks OK to me - the bit of disease on the leaves is unlikely to be serious - keep it well watered if we go through a dry spell, and I reckon it will go on growing to become a fine tree.

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