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  • Pressure Cooker Cooking

    Hello folks,

    I've just found an old pressure cooker, it doesn't have any instructions with it so I have contacted Prestige for a manual.
    Whilst I am waiting for that from them I was wondering if any of you use one?
    What are your favourite/best things to cook in one?
    Any other hints or tips?
    I have never used one before but the idea of being able to cook things quickly does appeal.
    Always aim for the best result possible not the best possible result

    Forever indebted to Potstubsdustbins

  • #2
    We used to cook loads in one........even me on occasion, we did however bin it and all our aluminium saucepans 30 years ago and we got out of the habit of using one. You could.............allegedly.................put a rubber hose on the top of one and boil up home made wine and distil it into your own moonshine..........not that I ever tried it of course...............................
    If I'm not on here, I'm probably fishing.

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    • #3
      stews, soup , stock , gammon , lentils, chickpeas. that's what i cook the most of ....mines only got one weight ..not like some that have 3 different ones.

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      • #4
        I used to have one years ago but it used to scare me to death so now it is just used as a big pan on rare occasions.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Ms-T View Post
          stews, soup , stock , gammon , lentils, chickpeas. that's what i cook the most of ....mines only got one weight ..not like some that have 3 different ones.
          Ooh lentils, I've just bought a bag of those, wouldn't have crossed my mind, had you not mentioned it, so thank you
          I don't even understand the weight thing yet!
          Always aim for the best result possible not the best possible result

          Forever indebted to Potstubsdustbins

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          • #6
            I use mine a fair bit mostly for quick soups especially those I’m got to blend we also have a small one that handy to take camping. Stopping using it for mushy peas after they ended up on the ceiling those now go in the slow cooker.

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            • #7
              As well as the above mentioned, they're great for cooking dry beans.
              Instead of 40 minutes in a pan, 15 minutes or so in the pressure cooker is plenty. You can even do them straight from dry, without soaking them overnight, although you need to add 5-10 minutes to the cooking time and if you don't pre-soak they are liable to split their skins.

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              • #8
                I’ve only had mine for just under a year, so am still learning the ropes.
                It has a valve with 2 pressure settings (I presume other models have different weights added to create the pressure, instead of a valve with 2 positions?).

                I have found it most useful for cooking stuff which would take a long time in a normal saucepan - whole beetroot, dried pulses, gammon joint, stocks etc. I’ve heard it’s possible to cook Christmas puddings in them too, so will give that a go next time we have a rainy day ;-)

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                • #9
                  Beetroot is really nice done in the p/c.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks everyone. It's great hearing how you use your Pressure Cookers.
                    I've had a little read up about them. Mine is an older style with10 and 15 weights.
                    I am definitely going to use it for lentils and stews, apparently they're very good for cooking cheaper cuts of meat and making them nice and tender.
                    Always aim for the best result possible not the best possible result

                    Forever indebted to Potstubsdustbins

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                    • #11
                      https://www.hippressurecooking.com/
                      She does a lot of Instant Pot stuff now, but look at the recipes for inspiration, just to get an idea of what you can do.

                      Happy to answer any questions.

                      Living in north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep.

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                      • #12
                        Oh yeah, one other thing a pressure cooker is useful for is complete sterilisation.
                        Using boiling water or sterilising tablets doesn't actually kill everything. It kills everything that really matters, vis-a-vis food safety, but certain mould spores and most bacterial endospores can survive both boiling temperatures and sterilising chemicals.
                        A pressure cooker at 15psi, however, gets hot enough to kill everything, just like a medical autoclave does.

                        Admittedly, the situations where you would actually need something 100% sterile are very few. I used to use it when I grew my own mushrooms. The jars of grain you grown out the mushroom mycellia on need to be completely sterile, as they naturally come with bacterial spores which which germinate and grow, making the whole batch turn rancid. So I would place a thin trivet on the bottom of the pressure cooker, put about and inch of water in, and load it with as many filled and lidded jars as would fit.

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                        • #13
                          How's it going, Peanut? Did you manage to get a manual and a gasket?
                          Living in north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep.

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                          • #14
                            I got a stainless steel one a few years ago. Mainly used for; potatoes (7 minutes); beetroot 20 to 40 minutes depending; pulses, 1 hour soak in hot water then 10 to 20 minutes depending on type.

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                            • #15
                              Don't want to force pressure cooking down anyone's neck, but it's a shame if you have one and could be using it more to save effort and fuel.

                              Today, for example, I'm making an Ethiopian spicy chicken dish (doro wat) plus an Ethiopian spicy lentil dish (misir wat) for lunch. Then for supper, cauliflower, pear and blue cheese soup. All three very little effort but packed with flavour and none take long to cook. The doro wat is the longest: 15 minutes at high pressure. The lentils are 6 minutes at high pressure.

                              Living in north-east Spain, where the sun is too hot, the rain too torrential, the hail too big, the wind too windy and the snow too deep.

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