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Thread: Sweet Peas

  1. #1
    veggiechicken's Avatar
    veggiechicken is online now Warning!! Contains Nuts
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    Default Sweet Peas

    According to a scrap of paper torn from a Kings seed catalogue:-

    "Seed sowing can begin in October, through to late February but I (Kings) find the optimum time is Early November.

    Sow 5 seeds into a 7.5cm/3" deep pot, using a good growing medium.

    Keep in a cold frame, do not let the soil dry out but do not over water.

    In (Kings) experience, chipping and soaking the seeds is not necessary.

    When the plants have grown 3 pairs of true leaves, pinch out the tops to encourage side shoots for the promotion of greater flower production.

    Harden off, prior to planting out in early April (weather permitting) and feed with foliage or soil dressing at fortnightly intervals.

    Direct sowings in October or March an also be made in the flowering site. "

    Any one sowing their sweet peas now? I'm going to sow some tomorrow. I'd like rows of them to pick next year.
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  2. #2
    Martin H's Avatar
    Martin H is offline Early Fruiter
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by veggiechicken View Post
    Any one sowing their sweet peas now? I'm going to sow some tomorrow. I'd like rows of them to pick next year.
    I sowed mine in the middle of last month, in rootrainers. No chipping, no soaking, I just moistened the multipurpose compost before filling the pots then dropped the seeds in just below the surface. The compost is right when it sticks together when squeezed in your hand, but no water drips out. They germinate in a week or so in the cold greenhouse.

    I treat them tougher than Kings suggests. Now that the seedings are a couple of inches tall I have put the tray of pots outside on my garden table. They will stay there in all but the very worst freezing weather until spring. I don't want them to grow much top growth until spring and I won't pinch the tops out until spring either. They will make masses of root and be planted out as soon as I can get the soil is ready in March, no further hardening off needed.
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  3. #3
    Mark_Riga is offline Rooter
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    Chris, my OH is the sweet pea person here but she is reading an essay currently on behalf of daughter no. 2 so unlikely to be sowing in the near future. We plant them in rows with a 6'+ stake at either end supporting netting and 8' canes then along the row. They usually get got by mildew from mid summer onwards - which I put down to the lack of weeding which harbours damp.
    We've occasionally sown some in Autumn but didn't think they flowered much earlier than those sown in early Spring so not really worth the effort of looking after them over winter.
    We go to the The Eckford Sweet Pea Society show in Wem quite regularly but the entries and the membership has declined the last couple of years.
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  4. #4
    Thelma Sanders is offline Gardening Guru
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    I don't sow mine until the new year, and then have to remember to cover them, or else the mices tuck in
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  5. #5
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    We ARE to start them off this autumn. Not got round to it yet. Looks like spring the way things are going.
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  6. #6
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    Chrissyteacup is offline Sprouter
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    Oh this is interesting, I’ve bought some to try to grow this year (I’ve not grown them before) I might experiment start some now and some in January see how they compare!
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  7. #7
    Babru is offline Sprouter
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    I tried autumn sowing in rootrainers years ago, but found many of the plants didn't make it through the winter. May well be worth it in more southerly climes though. Perhaps plant some now, hopefully for early flowering, then some in spring to flower later and take you through till autumn.
    Last edited by Babru; 10-11-2018 at 10:06 PM.

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    nickdub is offline Early Fruiter
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    I've succumbed to "sowing envy" :-(

    Had a load of seeds I saved from plants grown this year from a 50p pack of Wilkinson seed , so I've put them all to chit in the airing-cupboard. Last of the big spenders - the economy would collapse if everyone was like me :-)
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