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Thread: Mouldy Hyacinth Bulbs

  1. #9
    WendyC is offline Early Fruiter
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    I watched the Beechgrove programme where they really wetted the bulb fibre. I've never watered them that much but then mine are never ready for Chr-----s either. To keep them dark I put two black plastic flower pots over the top, arranged so the holes aren't lined up and don't let light through. I do feel a bit silly with my face in the flower pot checking for light. Then they are put on the shed floor, where they get kicked at regular intervals which reminds me to check and water if needed.

  2. #10
    Two_Sheds's Avatar
    Two_Sheds is offline Compost Everything...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam2702 View Post
    I planted them in wet compost ... with no drainage holes ... wrapped them in a black bin liner
    They are going to rot if you keep them wet and dark. Are you sure that's what Beechgrove meant you to do?
    I force daffs, tulips & hyacinths too, but all I do is put them in compost in a pot, water the pot lightly by sitting it in a gravel tray for a few mins, then pop into the cool dark (my garage).
    The bulbs can breathe and the compost isn't wet
    All gardeners know better than other gardeners." -- Chinese Proverb.

  3. #11
    WendyC is offline Early Fruiter
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    They definitely soaked the compost, just squeezed out the worst. Can't remember where they put them after that but I'm pretty sure they didn't put in a plastic bag. It is a recipe for mould.
    I do pretty much the same as you.

  4. #12
    Sam2702 is offline Seedling
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    That's definitely what they said on Beechgrove, they actually squeezed the compost so that water came out!

    I will take them up this evening, scrape the mould off and see if they have rotted, if not I'll repot, see if that works, otherwise I'll just have to go and buy some more. Do I still have time to force them for Christmas? I think I might try the idea of putting a plant pot over the top and see if that works. Thanks everyone.

  5. #13
    Sam2702 is offline Seedling
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    From what I remember they did 2 different things, Carol (is that her name) covered with sand and Jim put in a bag!

  6. #14
    veggiechicken's Avatar
    veggiechicken is online now Warning!! Contains Nuts
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    Was it the latest episode of Beechgrove? Soon to be available on iplayer BBC One - Beechgrove Garden, 2013, Episode 25 I'm curious now
    Make 2019 the Year of Random Seed sowing
    @realveggiechicken

    All we are saying is..........Give seeds a chance.

  7. #15
    Sam2702 is offline Seedling
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    Here you go - I found the factsheet but wasn't able to attach the whole thing.

    He then put the bulb fibre
    into the pots and then
    planted the bulbs a
    finger’s width apart. The
    bulbs should not be
    touching and their necks
    should be above the bulb
    fibre in the pot. Jim also advised to plant only one
    variety of bulbs in each pot.
    Jim chose to place the planted pots into a black
    polythene bag which can be stored in the garage
    at a frost-free temperature of 7°C. They have to
    be cold for the roots to fill the pots; they should
    also be checked frequently and watered if
    required. After 8-10 weeks in these conditions,
    the forming flower should be through the top of
    the neck of the bulb.
    Unlike Jim, Carole planted
    individual bulbs into
    individual pots. This has
    an advantage because
    once they have been
    ‘forced’ the best bulb can
    be selected and planted
    in multiple displays. Carole used normal compost
    to plant the bulbs since the pots she used have
    drainage holes at the bottom…
    Once planted, Carole’s pots were then ‘plunged’
    into a sand-lined raised bed outdoors. The bulbs
    were then covered with 2-3 inches of leaf mould
    and then covered with black polythene to keep the
    rain off them.

  8. #16
    veggiechicken's Avatar
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    Thanks Sam I'm glad I grow mine in vases of water
    Make 2019 the Year of Random Seed sowing
    @realveggiechicken

    All we are saying is..........Give seeds a chance.

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