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  1. #1
    basketcase is offline Tuber
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    Default Underplanting Raspberries

    Is there anything you can grow between rows of raspberry canes?

    I've cleared the raspberry frame I inherited (a 'neighbour' told me the rasps were "pushing 10 years old"). The whole frame was covered in weeds and I'm going to dig it out and replace the soil to have a completely fresh start.

    So can I grow stuff between the rows? If so, what? Something that suppresses weeds and/or improves the rasps would be good...

  2. #2
    Capsid's Avatar
    Capsid is offline Early Fruiter
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    I was under the impression that you should try to keep the area free of weeds so as not to impede growth of new shoots. Underplanting would also compete for those valuable nutrients.

  3. #3
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    sarraceniac is offline Cropper
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    Sorry BC. I agree with Capsid. After 10 years the canes have had it anyway but you could let them grow in a cleared plot next year and start again with their runners (or if there are runners there just dig out the old canes and let the new canes have their say) if you have a large area and don't want to spend a fortune on new canes. You would lose a couple of years instead of one year (unless there are existing rogue young canes) but whether it is economic is your decision and if it is just a matter of a few canes then starting again new would probably be wisest. I did just that with some old autumns last year and put in new Polkas. Glad I did. Not many fruits this year but they are bootiful. Large and sweet and next year ..... mmmmmm.

    But to reinforce Capsid's advice, they don't want competition for the best fruit.
    Why didn't Noah just swat those 2 greenflies?

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  4. #4
    DC Veggies is offline Germinator
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    Default Raspberry canes

    Hi
    As an aside to this I planted some Raspberry canes this year.
    I did not get alot of fruit off them but the canes have grown quite high.

    Should they be cropped down for the winter or do i just leave them ?

  5. #5
    Capsid's Avatar
    Capsid is offline Early Fruiter
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    What are they? Autumn of summer fruiting?

    Autumn fruiting; cut all the canes down to ground level in February
    Summer fruiting; cut down fruited canes after fruiting

  6. #6
    basketcase is offline Tuber
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarraceniac View Post
    Sorry BC. I agree with Capsid. After 10 years the canes have had it anyway but you could let them grow in a cleared plot next year and start again with their runners (or if there are runners there just dig out the old canes and let the new canes have their say) if you have a large area and don't want to spend a fortune on new canes. You would lose a couple of years instead of one year (unless there are existing rogue young canes) but whether it is economic is your decision and if it is just a matter of a few canes then starting again new would probably be wisest. I did just that with some old autumns last year and put in new Polkas. Glad I did. Not many fruits this year but they are bootiful. Large and sweet and next year ..... mmmmmm.

    But to reinforce Capsid's advice, they don't want competition for the best fruit.
    Thanks for the advice (both you and capsid). I did wonder.

    I've already cleared the old canes away. They all seemed to be summer fruiting and there were about 15, I think). I've ordered some from Marshall's (6xGlen Moy, 6xGlen Ample and 6xJoan J), which my fellow plotters approve of - though they think I should have gone to the local place. I would have - but when I went there weren't any rasps and I didn't know they get them later!

    Anyway, if there's nothing that will make a positive contribution to the soil, would you suggest leaving it bare, or covering it with bark or something to suppress the weeds?

  7. #7
    Capsid's Avatar
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    You can apply a mulch.

    All raspberries will appreciate a layer of well rotted compost being applied to the soil in February each year. Because raspberry roots are very near the surface, do not dig the compost into the soil, this will only damage the roots. In the absence of compost, scatter a handful of bone meal to each square metre (3ft).
    From here Raspberry Care and Picking / Harvesting - Page 3

  8. #8
    basketcase is offline Tuber
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    Thanks for the link, Capsid. I did wonder about green manure, but mulch it is!

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