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Thread: Scion rooting - apple trees

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    devonuk is online now Sprouter
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    Default Scion rooting - apple trees

    How reliably do apples scion root when you positively want them too, and therefore bury the graft union?

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    nickdub is offline Early Fruiter
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    depends a bit on the soil and the time-scale. If its reasonably damp loam, and you left them with the union buried for more than about 3 years, I reckon you'd get 95% rooted from the scion.

    Of course what the outcome of this, would very much depends on the variety and root-stocks in question - some types are much stronger growers than others and the impact of scion rooting on those for the overall size of the mature tree could be significant.

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    devonuk is online now Sprouter
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    Thank you.

    I have some Devon banks where it would be quite fun to have a couple of standard apples, which would have to be planted into existing hedgerow, so I was thinking the cheapest way of doing this would be buy some 5 supermarket trees over the summer, plant them deep and see what happens.

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    nickdub is offline Early Fruiter
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    Quote Originally Posted by devonuk View Post
    Thank you.

    I have some Devon banks where it would be quite fun to have a couple of standard apples, which would have to be planted into existing hedgerow, so I was thinking the cheapest way of doing this would be buy some 5 supermarket trees over the summer, plant them deep and see what happens.
    As I say the result you get will depend on the variety, Bramley is by far the strongest grower I know of the commonly grown apples - I reckon a Bramley on its own roots would probably top 60' eventually.

    Bear in mind that apples come in to fruit partly depending on their maturity, so 20 years is not out of the way for a standard tree to get in to its stride, as it were.

    BTW another way round setting about the project you outline, would be to germinate some apple pips and then after a couple of years use these pippins as root-stocks on to which you could graft the scions you wanted. This was the usual way of proceeding with apple trees up to about 100 years ago.

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    veggiechicken's Avatar
    veggiechicken is online now Warning!! Contains Nuts
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    Could you stick some cuttings in the hedgerow and let them do their own thing?
    I have an apple tree grown that way.
    Make 2019 the Year of Random Seed sowing
    All we are saying is..........Give seeds a chance.
    @realveggiechicken

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    nickdub is offline Early Fruiter
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    You could, though obviously you'd get a better "strike rate" if you started the cuttings in the normal way first for a year say, then subsequently transplanted them.

    I remember back in the day I was picking plums on my cousin's farm and noticed that one of the trees in a field had different fruit to all the others. Intrigued I went back in the Spring and took some substantial cuttings with a view to try to bud them later in the year. As I often do I stuck the cuttings in the ground to keep, later on I went back and did a try at budding which proved unsuccessful. What I didn't realise til some time later was that one of the cuttings had been left in the ground and had rooted. I still have that tree and it now crops - I'm not sure what the variety is but my best guess is "Dymock Red".
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    My tree came from an allotment neighbour. Apparently, they'd pruned/broken off a branch and stuck it in the ground without thinking of the consequences. They offered it to me for my plot but I brought it home instead. Its been here about 15 years - lovely apples, whatever they are. It produces a lot of burr knots however.

    Some chat about it at https://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gr...ree_65574.html
    Unfortunately the photos are missing.
    Last edited by veggiechicken; 26-04-2018 at 07:11 PM.
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    Make 2019 the Year of Random Seed sowing
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    devonuk is online now Sprouter
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    I have a lot of this years seedlings from supermarket apples, mainly gala and granny smith. I'm inclined to put some of these out there and leave them to it - the object is large trees, plus blossom - I contemplate any fruit being eaten as windfalls by whatever stock is in the fields. I was slightly hoping that the scion rooting plan would give a combination of rootstock precocity plus scion vigour; of course it's an extra complication that supermarkets keep the identity of the rootstock strictly to themselves.

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