Grow Your Own Magazine

Navbar button growfruitandveg.co.uk Logo
Forum Navigation

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 16
  1. #1
    darcyvuqua's Avatar
    darcyvuqua is offline Cropper
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    wales, mid glamorgan
    Posts
    1,838

    Default plum tree from seed

    ok i had a pack of 4 plums and ate them cracked the stones open and only got one seed that was not destroyed opening the stone

    has anyone germinated the seed and grew on to a healthy size?

    im gonna gine it a go anyways

  2. #2
    zazen999 is offline Funky Cold Ribena
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Coventry
    Posts
    20,557

    Default

    On my new site [see signature] we have about 250 self seeded damsons, and they are all looking healthy!

    We are digging them up and they will be sold as wild damsons next year, until we work out whether they are likely to be the same variety as the parents. Alternatively, we will use them as root stock and graft known varieties onto them.

    In her book The Thrifty Forager - Alys Fowler advocates sowing loads of fruit seeds so that in years to come, you can plant out fruit trees and bushes for later generations to forage from - and we will have a 'Future Foragers' bed where we sow fruit pips and seeds, and encourage visitors to do the same. And we'll donate these to local woodland projects as they grow.
    Last edited by zazen999; 19-10-2012 at 08:59 PM.


  3. #3
    veggiechicken's Avatar
    veggiechicken is online now Gardening Guru
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Sunshiny South Wales
    Posts
    62,478
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    What a smashing idea, Zaz! I've been wondering about damsons/plums myself. In my garden there is an old ?damson that has a number of small saplings around it. I've never worked out whether they are self seeded or suckered. Its the same with the wild cherry - but I've assumed that is suckers. I'm curious now!
    Garden like a Chicken
    @realveggiechicken

  4. #4
    darcyvuqua's Avatar
    darcyvuqua is offline Cropper
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    wales, mid glamorgan
    Posts
    1,838

    Default

    i would love to know more about grafting

  5. #5
    orangepippin is offline Tuber
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    York
    Posts
    511

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zazen999 View Post
    In her book The Thrifty Forager - Alys Fowler advocates sowing loads of fruit seeds so that in years to come, you can plant out fruit trees and bushes for later generations to forage from - and we will have a 'Future Foragers' bed where we sow fruit pips and seeds, and encourage visitors to do the same. And we'll donate these to local woodland projects as they grow.
    I think Alys is a bit misguided on this one. It probably works to an extent with plums, but generally doesn't work with apples - which do not grow true from seed. Seedling trees also take a long time to come into fruiting, compared to grafted trees. And when they finally do, certainly in the case of apples, for every 1 tree that is vaguely half-decent, you will get 99 that are crab-apples. That's because most commercial apples that you get in shops and markets are pollinated in the orchard by crab-apples.

    Far,far, better to learn to graft.

    If you really want to grow apple trees from seed (and I do, even though I know the odds of success are similar to the lottery) start with apples that have come from a very small orchard or from some kind of fruit tree collection, where pollination will have been from other good quality apples, not from crab apples.
    Last edited by orangepippin; 19-10-2012 at 09:56 PM.

  6. #6
    zazen999 is offline Funky Cold Ribena
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Coventry
    Posts
    20,557

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by orangepippin View Post
    I think Alys is a bit misguided on this one. It probably works to an extent with plums, but generally doesn't work with apples - which do not grow true from seed. Seedling trees also take a long time to come into fruiting, compared to grafted trees. And when they finally do, certainly in the case of apples, for every 1 tree that is vaguely half-decent, you will get 99 that are crab-apples. That's because most commercial apples that you get in shops and markets are pollinated in the orchard by crab-apples.

    Far,far, better to learn to graft.

    If you really want to grow apple trees from seed (and I do, even though I know the odds of success are similar to the lottery) start with apples that have come from a very small orchard or from some kind of fruit tree collection, where pollination will have been from other good quality apples, not from crab apples.
    Yes - that's why I said that they would be used as grafting material if they didn't come true. And the idea IS that they take years - not for immediate use.
    Last edited by zazen999; 19-10-2012 at 10:08 PM.


  7. #7
    zazen999 is offline Funky Cold Ribena
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Coventry
    Posts
    20,557

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by veggiechicken View Post
    What a smashing idea, Zaz! I've been wondering about damsons/plums myself. In my garden there is an old ?damson that has a number of small saplings around it. I've never worked out whether they are self seeded or suckered. Its the same with the wild cherry - but I've assumed that is suckers. I'm curious now!
    You can use the saplings as root stock and graft onto those so that you know what the samson is going to actually be. Clever isn't it?


  8. #8
    orangepippin is offline Tuber
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    York
    Posts
    511

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zazen999 View Post
    Yes - that's why I said that they would be used as grafting material if they didn't come true. And the idea IS that they take years - not for immediate use.
    I can't see the point of grafting at some point in the future on to failed seedling trees, which in any case are extremely wasteful of space, and space is likely to be more and more precious in the future. It is not as if these seedling trees will take that long either, my last batch started producing (crab apples) after 4 years, which is hardly planting for your heirs. This sounds like a romantic idea that hasn't been thought through properly - although I must admit I have not seen first hand what Alys is proposing so I could well have misunderstood it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts