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Thread: A good read

  1. #1
    nickdub is online now Early Fruiter
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    Default A good read

    I came across the site below, which I thought might interest others who would like to know more about the history of fruit trees in the UK.
    Fruit Trees- Historic Varieties Grown and Supplied by Bernwode Fruit Trees
    Snadger, BUFFS, fishpond and 2 others like this.

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    fishpond is offline Cropper
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    Thank You---Brilliant read.
    BeeHappyFlutterBy likes this.
    Feed the soil, not the plants.
    (helps if you have cluckies)

    Man v Squirrels, pidgeons & Ants
    Bob

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    Agree, a brilliant read thanks for the link - will be going back for another read as I couldn't absorb all the info, really fascinating to read the considerable age fruit trees can get too, I had no idea, I have an old Apple tree it's looking rather sorry for itself so hopefully may get some info on how to rejuvenate it-I'm thinking this will be one link to print off to re read
    “It was the bumble bee and the butterfly who survived, not the dinosaur” — Meridel Le Sueur

    "We are stardust, we are golden, and we've got to get ourselves back to the garden."
    - Joni Mitchell

    http://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gra...owerpower.html

  4. #4
    nickdub is online now Early Fruiter
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    Old trees have amazing powers of recovery and it is possible to help them. One tool everybody who is more than moderately interested in fruit growing should have is a really sharp hooked pruning-knife. Any deadwood that can be carefully removed should be, as long as it isn't structural to the main trunk - cutting-out dead and/or diseased wood will allow the tree to have a better chance to heal itself - a bit like surgery does for animals.

    If your old tree is large and hasn't had much pruning one thing you can do is use a bow saw to cut out one large branch near the center to open it up to let in light and air. Feeding may prompt growth too - the state of the leaves and any fruit will guide you as to whether that would be a good idea - many old trees look a bit poorly because they are starving.

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    Thanks, ND will take the feeding advice on board- the tree was very well pruned back last year as it was so high the fruit was nigh on impossible to pick, and most of the really high apples fell, bruised and ended up as chicken feed, as the wasps had capitalized on the fallen treasure Its now a more manageable height but is looking a bit sorry for itself i think as you say - feed is likely the best route, can you recommend any- would appreciate your advice
    “It was the bumble bee and the butterfly who survived, not the dinosaur” — Meridel Le Sueur

    "We are stardust, we are golden, and we've got to get ourselves back to the garden."
    - Joni Mitchell

    http://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gra...owerpower.html

  6. #6
    nickdub is online now Early Fruiter
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    Hi BeeH,

    A photo of your tree would help, in order to make the advice specific as to what would be best.

    Generally speaking I'd say don't over prune - taking out just one or two large branches can help more than a general haircut.

    If the tree is growing in grass, then it may be best to remove some of that as it competes for nutrients. Feeding is best done with compost or manure (horse or cow for preference) but other things like leaves and/or grass-mowings can also be useful. You can also use inorgannic fertilisers like sulphate of ammonia, but my impression is that a lot of these have become so expensive that they are a doubtful proposition from a cost/benefit POV.

    BTW feeding is best done in Spring / early Summer, so the tree can use the nutrients immediately

    Nick

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    I think maybe it's been over pruned Nick chap that did it said it was needed so took his advice - yes it is growing in the grass in the orchard. Can easily sort out your recommended manure feed for the spring, would only have to put tempory fencing around the tree as the chooks free range in the orchard and would do what chooks do and nosey through it for tasty's LOL, also I use grass clippings with our chicken manure well rotted of course on the veg plots so would that benefit too? Interestingly the other two apple trees don't have as much grass growing as close to them and aren't looking so sorry for themselves albeit they are younger trees so don't know if that has any bearing on them.
    “It was the bumble bee and the butterfly who survived, not the dinosaur” — Meridel Le Sueur

    "We are stardust, we are golden, and we've got to get ourselves back to the garden."
    - Joni Mitchell

    http://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gra...owerpower.html

  8. #8
    nickdub is online now Early Fruiter
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    Sounds ideal - chicken manure as you probably know is v strong, so should do well for re-invigorating growth. If you decide to keep the grass round the tree (I do with mine through laziness), then mow it as short as reasonable in the Spring when it starts growing.

    Assuming your tree starts to throw lots of spindly growth after its haircut (quite likely) then probably best to prune out around half of this new growth completely and leave the rest unpruned to try to get strong branches. One way of encouraging the tree to develop flower spurs on this new growth is to bend these whippy branches round in a circle and tie them off at the tips

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