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Thread: Corden/arch apple trees

  1. #1
    Philosophical is offline Germinator
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    Default Corden/arch apple trees

    Hello all,

    I'm based in North Essex, and I've just moved into a lovely new build house. The garden is small, but there's a corner I want to cover with an archway covered in a couple of apple trees.

    I want to plant them this winter, and I'm prepared to wait for them to form an arch. I'll be adding about 30,000 tonnes of compost and food to the soil as well to make up for the tiny amount of actual soil the builders put down.

    Which varieties would suit this?
    What are people's favourites?
    I think I need a M26 rootstock - is that about right?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    burnie is offline Veggie gardener
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    30000 tonnes, blimey in a small garden?
    Philosophical likes this.

  3. #3
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    FB.
    FB. is offline Early Fruiter
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    How big do you need the archway to be?
    How much sun will they get?
    Do you intend to spray them to prevent pests and diseases?
    Which varieties do you hope to grow? Common ones? Rare ones?

    Rootstock is only one part of the tree; the scion will also influence the size.

    Personally, I'd look into varieties which are low-medium vigour, predominantly spur-bearing, naturally well-branched, but on a medium-strong rootstock.
    A small tree on big roots is usually happier than a big tree on small roots.
    .

  4. #4
    Lardman is offline Rooter
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    Are you growing them to eat or look pretty in terms of blossom and fruit ?

    If you're growing for fruit it makes sense to start with the type of apple you like to eat

  5. #5
    FB.'s Avatar
    FB.
    FB. is offline Early Fruiter
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lardman View Post
    Are you growing them to eat or look pretty in terms of blossom and fruit ?

    If you're growing for fruit it makes sense to start with the type of apple you like to eat
    I think the most attractive blossoms are those of part-tip-bearers which are triploid.
    Part-tip gives a nice even coverage of blossom, including on the previous season's shoots which are often conspicuously bare on spur-bearers. Being triploid generally makes the flowers larger.

    Unfortunately part-tip-bearing complicates pruning and triploids are often more interested in growing than fruiting, which isn't helpful for formal/trained styles.
    .

  6. #6
    Philosophical is offline Germinator
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    Quote Originally Posted by burnie View Post
    30000 tonnes, blimey in a small garden?
    Well I want the thing to grow!!

  7. #7
    Philosophical is offline Germinator
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    Quote Originally Posted by FB. View Post
    How big do you need the archway to be?
    How much sun will they get?
    Do you intend to spray them to prevent pests and diseases?
    Which varieties do you hope to grow? Common ones? Rare ones?

    Rootstock is only one part of the tree; the scion will also influence the size.

    Personally, I'd look into varieties which are low-medium vigour, predominantly spur-bearing, naturally well-branched, but on a medium-strong rootstock.
    A small tree on big roots is usually happier than a big tree on small roots.

    Thank you all for your responses.. some replies to your questions

    So the archway will be about 2 metres wide, with a tree on each side.

    One side will get a lot of sun, the other is next to a north facing fence so not as much.

    I would prefer to stay organic... But could be swayed.

    And I'd like to eat them! I'm not fussy when it comes to taste, as long as it's not too sharp I'll be happy!

    And another question - what's a Scion?

  8. #8
    burnie is offline Veggie gardener
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    scion

    a young shoot or twig of a plant, especially one cut for grafting or rooting.

    I can recommend Howgate Wonder as a dual purpose fruit,(cooking or eating) relatively trouble free, tasty and has produced the largest single fruit on record.

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